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A lot has changed in Drupal 8, and many people are close to completing or launching their first build. With any new build, you may be wondering how to ensure security and confidence in your site.

In this webinar, we’ll discuss some of the common security issues Acquia’s Professional Services department has found when doing security audits. Most of these issues are based around developers trying to make Drupal 8 work the way it did in previous versions. Additionally, there are some new security features you may not be aware of.

Topics will include:

Today’s technology landscape is riddled with constantly evolving web platforms, exciting new technologies, and stubborn legacy systems. It’s easy for business teams, who are rapidly creating content for these many sites and channels, to lose sight of what content is created and where it lives.

As a result, data and content are locked in back-end systems across organizations. And, because it’s difficult and expensive to connect technologies, teams end up wasting time and resources in efforts to publish that content on the web.

As Drupal begins to be more widely used as a back end for web services and for application ecosystems by extension, developers of wildly diverse backgrounds are now consuming and manipulating data from Drupal in unprecedented ways. There's just one problem: JavaScript and native application developers don't speak Drupal.

Module development in Drupal 8 is drastically different from Drupal 7 and previous versions of Drupal. The changes in Drupal 8 can appear daunting at first, but after you learn a few tricks you’ll be surprised by how much you can do with so little code.

In today’s world, digital technology executives and their IT teams are facing expanding applications and demand for managing digital experiences, driven by business initiatives such as digital marketing campaigns, global branding, and commerce deployments. In addition to executing ever-growing site delivery requests, IT teams are pressed to accommodate internal requirements for content flexibility, cost efficiency and continuous multi-site performance - often causing conflicting obligations.

Back in 2011, the State of Georgia was experiencing nothing short of a “technology crisis,” complete with high operating costs, a crumbling infrastructure and a web presence of disparate sites. While most of their manpower was spent keeping the websites for state agencies and elected officials up and running, there was very little time to implement a true digital strategy, which resulted in a confusing and frustrating experience for residents.

Having a content management system (CMS) in place for my website means that I don't have to worry about maintaining my content, right? Well, not exactly... and when you get down to it, content maintenance is something that your organization should actively plan for.