Acquia

99 Paid Internships Later, UMass Boston Uses Hands-On Learning to Prepare Students for the Startup Scene [Sept 19, 2012]

Submitted on
mercredi, le 19 septembre 2012h
,
Bostinno

The goal of UMass Boston’s Entrepreneurship Center is simple: to get students out and working in the city’s startup community. Since opening four years ago, the Center has grown to offer 99 paid — yes, paid — internships with nearly 45 Massachusetts-based companies, including Buzzient, peerTransfer, Acquia and MassChallenge.

The added bonus? About 70 percent of those students are getting hired full-time when they graduate, according to the Center’s Founder and Director Dan Phillips, the former CEO of SilverBack Technologies and COO of Concord Communications.

Because the Center only opened four years ago, Phillips says it’s “a startup to begin with” and that they’ve “been growing this incrementally.” At the core of the program rests a hands-on approach to learning, which is reflected in both the internship program and the Center’s two cornerstone courses.

Gartner's Web CMS Magic Quadrant: Oracle, Adobe, SDL, Sitecore, It's Deja Vu [Sept 10, 2012]

Submitted on
lundi, le 10 septembre 2012h
,
CMS Wire

It's Still a Who's Who of WCM
I wish I could show you the magic quadrant diagram to give the picture in a quick snapshot, but I can't. Suffice it say the players are pretty much all the same — this is a who's who of web content management. What does this tell us? I think it tells us that the game is still the same and the established players have all the equipment necessary to play it.

Taking a quick look back at where vendors were on the WCM MQ list last year (in November to be exact), you can see that the leaders are solidified and it will take some bold moves to get into that quadrant. Interestingly, Ektron has been able to do it. Oops. Did I spoil the surprise?

Badgeville Releases Its Gamification Platform for Drupal [Sept 5, 2012]

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mercredi, le 5 septembre 2012h
,
CMS Wire

Drupal, get ready for some fun. Badgeville announced the launch of its gamification and behavior management platform for the open-source content, social and commerce management system.

The integration is designed to simplify the ability to apply what Badgeville calls “engagement mechanics” to websites built and managed with Drupal. It will be offered by Drupal-service provider Acquia to its customers.

Badgeville and Acquia Partner to Deliver First Gamification Platform Capability for Thousands of Drupal Communities [August 30, 2012]

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jeudi, le 30 août 2012h
,

Menlo Park, Calif. -- Badgeville, the #1 gamification and behavior management platform, today announced the launch of Badgeville for Drupal, the first integration to drive user generated content and other rich user behaviors on top of popular websites and online communities. With this announcement, Badgeville becomes the first gamification platform to offer a pre-packaged integration with Drupal, the leading open-source platform for building rich content, social and commerce experiences.

Badgeville for Drupal makes it easy to apply engagement mechanics on top of Drupal-powered websites. Badgeville for Drupal can drive and reward myriad behaviors, including starting discussion forums, writing and replying to blog posts, and commenting. By creating a more sticky experience on top of Drupal’s rich content tools, companies leveraging Badgeville for Drupal can increase customer loyalty, satisfaction, and retention...

Why I Stopped Giving It Away [Aug 27, 2012]

Submitted on
lundi, le 27 août 2012h
,
Inc

Becoming a hero among Web developers was cool--but it didn't actually pay. So Dries Buytaert, the developer of Drupal, built a company.

Recently I was in Portland, Oregon, and as I was walking to my hotel, some guy comes up to me and says, "Are you Dries?"

It's not like I'm a pop star, but I do get recognized. It happens at the airport, in supermarkets, and even at the beach.

I'm not the kind of person who likes to be in the spotlight. But at the same time, I feel very natural in my role, and so when I get recognized on the street, it's nice to have an opportunity to learn how that person is using Drupal.

There is a lot of passion in the Drupal community. I've seen people shave their heads and leave nothing but a Druplicon, Drupal's logo. At Drupal events, some developers dress up as the Druplicon. Some people have even gotten Drupal tattoos.

Has cash corrupted open source? [Aug 24, 2012]

Submitted on
vendredi, le 24 août 2012h
,
The Register

Open ... and Shut There once was a time when open source was all about peace, love, and Linux, a bottom-up community of self-selecting hackers that chummed together for the love of good code.

As soon as Linux hit pay dirt, the nature of the open-source community changed forever. Today it is virtually impossible for a successful open-source project to hit critical mass without being consumed by venture capital dollars.

Is this a good thing?

The thought struck me when reading Brian Proffitt's excellent analysis of how "OpenStack is no Linux". Proffitt's point is that "the destiny of OpenStack has been very heavily involved with commercial interests from the very start" - unlike Linux, which only attracted commercial interest later in its development. The implicit accusation feels a bit Lloyd Bentsen-esque: "Senator, you're no Jack Kennedy."

Acquia Buys Mollom, Offers Social Content Moderation Platform [Aug 14, 2012]

Submitted on
mardi, le 14 août 2012h
,
CMS Wire

Acquia has just announced that it is buying content monitoring vendor Mollom. With Mollom, Acquia says it will be able to build the first social content moderation platform that will ensure the quality of content that appears on client’s websites.

If you have already heard Mollom mentioned in the context of Acquia, it may be because Mollom was co-founded by Benjamin Schrauwen and Dries Buytaert, who is also the co-founder and current CTO of Acquia.

In fact it was because of this link that the two companies were finally merged. In a blog post by Buytaert, he said it made a lot of sense. Both he and Schrauwen were trying to raise capital for Mollom to help fund future product development and expand operations.

Acquia Buys Mollom for Spam Management [Aug 14, 2012]

Submitted on
mardi, le 14 août 2012h
,
VentureWire

Acquia Inc., a venture-backed provider of content management software, has bought content monitoring company Mollom BVBA to boost its ability to manage user-generated content.
Terms of the deal weren't disclosed in a news release....

Drupal Company Acquires Akismet Competitor Mollom To Kill Spam Dead [Aug 14, 2012]

Submitted on
mardi, le 14 août 2012h
,
TechCrunch

Today Acquia, the company co-founded by Drupal creator Dries Buytaert to commercialize the open source content management system, acquired Mollom, a spam filtering service also co-founded by Buytaert. Terms of the deal were not disclosed.

Acquia CEO Tom Erickson tells me the Mollom service will continue to be available for non-Drupal users and pricing will remain unchanged.

Mollom competes with Akismet, the comment spam filtering service provided by WordPress backers Automattic. But Erickson downplays the role that competing with Automattic plays in the acquisition, saying that Drupal generally doesn’t compete head-to-head with WordPress. He says Drupal tends to be used for large sites while WordPress is used for blogs and small sites.

Acquia Acquires Mollom for “Community-Backed Content Moderation Platform” [Aug 14, 2012]

Submitted on
mardi, le 14 août 2012h
,
Xconomy

Burlington, MA-based Acquia, a provider of enterprise-level software and services for the open source, social Web publishing system Drupal, is revealing this morning that it has acquired spam-blocking software maker Mollom. Financial details of the transaction were not disclosed, but it appears that the deal is more of a strategic play for both companies than a big startup exit, given that Mollom was co-founded by Acquia CTO and co-founder Dries Buytaert, also Drupal’s original author.

Mollom is a machine-learning play that evaluates user-submitted content—like comments, videos, or software code—on websites and determines the trustworthiness of the source based on parameters a company has set. It requires a CAPTCHA authentication of submissions that look suspicious, and learns from previous instances.

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