Home / Taxonomy term

open source

Open Source, Automotive Manufacturing & Obscurity

I’m very puzzled by the recent blog by Brian Prentice of Gartner. Comparing just-in-time manufacturing to open source software? Perhaps Brian is thinking of open source components like Apache Tomcat, which is often nestled inside of proprietary software solutions.

Beyond Social Business Software

Acquia issued a press release today contrasting Social Publishing platforms represented by Drupal and the growing number of Social Business Software products. At first glance it would seem that we don’t like those products, but that’s not the case. The products have some nice capabilities and many organizations are using them daily.

Building a business selling open-source software

Submitted on
Friday, August 1, 2014
,
The Open Road (CNET)

While TechDirt experiments with optimal configurations of digital media business models, Rob Walling has unwittingly landed on a sure-fire way to build billion-dollar open-source companies.

I say "unwittingly" because Walling's post is all about "How to Compete Against Open Source Competition." In the process, he does a fair job of describing how to build an exceptional open-source business.

Walling starts with a reprise of a classic Marten Mickos quote: "open-source software is free if your time is worth nothing." It's pithy and somewhat true, but it's not as rich as Mickos' commentary, which points to an opportunity in Walling's accusation.

Mix and match: The perfect open-source Web commerce company

Submitted on
Friday, August 1, 2014
,
The Open Road

Occasionally I get brilliant ideas about whom should merge with whom in open source. OK, so it's very occasionally, but I think I'll start sharing them under a "Mix and match" headline.

Forget Fantasy Football. It's time for "Fantasy Open Source."

Over the past few weeks I've spent a fair amount of time with the Acquia team, the company that offers a commercial distribution of the ubiquitous Drupal open-source Web content management system. Drupal is very strong in Web publishing and has an amazing community following, which makes it a nice pairing for two open-source projects/companies that help vendors make money over the Internet.

Start-up built on free software

Submitted on
Friday, August 1, 2014
,
Boston Globe

When cofounder Jay Batson was putting together his start-up Acquia last year, he figured one advantage would help it stand out from all the other companies that manage Web content for business clients.

The software was free.

"Free is very disruptive," Batson said. "In a fragmented market, 'free' commands a lot of attention."

Batson's Andover company sells products, services, and technical support for Drupal, an open source software platform originally authored by company cofounder Dries Buytaert. Open source means it's built and maintained by a worldwide army of volunteer programmers, and unlike the pricey products offered by traditional software companies, is available for anybody to use at no cost. With Drupal, Acquia would be able to price its services without having to charge customers for any hefty software license fees.

Future of Open Source 2009 Survey results

The results of North Bridge Venture Partners 2009 Future of Open Source survey were released today at the Infoworld Open Source Business Conference. Michael Skok led a panel discussion on the topic with Dries Buytaert from Acquia, Ron Hovsepian from Novell, John Lilly from Mozilla, Martin Mickos from Sun, and John Roberts from SugarCRM.

10 open source companies to watch

Submitted on
Friday, August 1, 2014
,
Network World

With the Open Source Conference (OSCon) and IDG's LinuxWorld show in the rearview mirror of 2008, it is clear that open source is no longer just a trendy conversation.

What has happened is a clear evolution of a community that has grown up and produced intelligent, cutting-edge technologies with an eye on making computing faster, smarter and cheaper for corporate users. Companies like Openmoko are challenging the mobile device market with its notion that users should control what applications are installed. Others like XAware and SnapLogic are opening up data integration possibilities, and still more are tangling with virtualization, databases, and trading systems. Along with a company accurately called Untangle, the companies' point is to make computing less complex.

The decision is no longer a question of open source, but about what product is best at solving computing problems regardless of how it was built.

Here is a look at 10 companies to watch.

Selling open-source 'ice' to the eskimos

Submitted on
Friday, August 1, 2014
,
The Open Road

Savio Rodrigues of InfoWorld tries to parse what makes open-source buyers tick, and how to generate more of them. In so doing, he suggests that the real battleground is over those enterprises with both money and expertise to go it alone with open-source software (so-called "Category B" customers).

Why should they bother buying support when they can self-support?

For me, this isn't the right question. Using his MySQL-derived customer classification system, the real question is, "Can proprietary software serve Category A (companies with more time than money) at all?" and "Can open source more efficiently serve Categories B and C too?"

Joining an Open Source Company

Joining Acquia not only marks the earliest stage that I’ve joined a company, but also the first time I’ve joined a commercial Open Source company. This was one of the main reasons I chose to join the company. Managing a services business at an Open Source software company creates some interesting challenges compared to my past experience in traditional software and consulting businesses.

Open source grabs more and more funding

Submitted on
Friday, August 1, 2014
,
BloggingStocks

Open source software continues its torrid pace. In fact, according to a report from the 451 Group, the sector saw its biggest quarter for venture funding -- hitting $203.75 million, which is up from $100.4 million in the same period a year ago.

Why the interest? Well, I had a chance to interview Matthew Aslett, who is an analyst of enterprise software at the 451 Group.

*Your take on the focus on open source?*

VCs are interested in open source vendors because the open source development and distribution models reduce start-up costs and lower the barriers to entry.

Pages