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CMO Interview: Marketing Open Source (to Marketers) [April 24, 2014]

Submitted on
Thursday, April 24, 2014
,
CMO

By Rohan Pearce

The CMO of Massachusetts-based Acquia wants to take the open source software message to other marketers

It's a product that costs nothing, is up against entrenched competitors, and exists in a category that enterprises have in the past been wary of. All in all, marketing open source software to other marketers was never going to be an easy job.

So you might forgive Tom Wentworth if he was a little wary of taking up the role of chief marketing officer at Acquia. But the CMO says that when he received a message from a recruiter asking if he was interested in the position, he jumped at the chance. "I couldn't have dialled back the number faster when I saw him asking about Acquia," Wentworth says.

Wentworth took up the role at Boston-based Acquia 17 months ago. The company provides software and services based on Drupal: A well-established, modular open source content management system.

Although it is Wentworth's first experience at an open source company, he has held marketing roles in other content management software vendors for about 15 years. Before Acquia, he was CMO at Ektron, and prior to that he was Web solutions evangelist at Interwoven, which was acquired in 2009 by Autonomy — which itself was snapped up by HP in 2011 (a somewhat fraught acquisition ).

Wentworth joined Acquia in December 2012. The decision was a "if you can't beat them, join them", he says. "As somebody's who's been in the market for so long, I saw the clear shift to open source and I saw the disruption Drupal was having in the market and really wanted to be a part of it.

"When I look at the future of integrated digital experiences and how I see CMOs are changing how they adapt digital technology, I think Drupal is so strongly suited for that and I had to find a way to get here."

Read more:

Open Source Pitfalls - and How to Avoid Them [April 21, 2014]

Submitted on
Monday, April 21, 2014
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Network World

By Maria Korolov, Network World

It's hard to imagine a company these days that isn't using open source software somewhere, whether it's Linux running a company's print and web servers, the Firefox browser on user desktops, or the Android operating system on mobile devices. In, fact, there are now more than a million different open source projects, according to Black Duck Software, a maker of open source management tools and owner of the Ohloh open source software directory. And open source continues to grow. According to an SAP research report, the number of open source projects roughly doubles every 14 months. But not all open source projects are created equal. According to Ohloh, for the 100,375 projects for which activity information is available, around 80 percent were listed as having low activity, very low activity or were completely inactive...

The success or failure of any particular open source project depends strongly on the community surrounding it – the developers who contribute code, the testers, the documentation writers, the people who answer questions in support forums, and the end users. There are a number of ways to gauge the size and activity level of an open source project's community. Ohloh offers one tool. Another approach is to go to the project's home page or the site where it's hosted and check out the history of code commits and the activity on the discussion boards.

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Welcome to the Open Source Renaissance [April 13, 2014]

Submitted on
Sunday, April 13, 2014
,
GigaOM

By Tom Erickson, Acquia CEO

Summary: Ever-popular among developers, open source technology has moved away from the fringes of tech right to the center of the enterprise, thanks to its high level of security and agility.

In the span of just a few years, open source has produced businesses that are incredibly attractive to the investment community. In 2012, open source venture investment jumped 80 percent over the prior year with $553 million invested, compared to $307 million in 2011. VCs have flocked to darlings like MongoDB, Open Stack, Cloudera, Puppet Labs and Hortonworks because these companies are solving incredibly difficult challenges in the cloud and big data arena faster than any proprietary software vendor could.

So why the big increase in interest now? Open source software has been around for years, in many cases implemented on the fringes by developers who prefer the freedom and flexibility of contributing to the evolution of the platforms with which they choose to work. There were even early glimmers of promise; for example, Linux proved to be a fast, effective server platform for many businesses before it grew to be one of the largest open source communities and the third-largest web client operating system in the world.

But today, open source has crossed over from a niche techie outlier to a driving force for businesses.

Read more.

Sensio Labs UK - Lessons and chances from Drupal 8 early adoption

Part 2 of 2 - I spoke with Richard Miller and Tom Kitchin, software engineers at SensioLabs UK and its parent company Inviqa respectively, via a Google Hangout on Air recently. Here, I learn the inside story on one of the first Drupal 8 sites online, www.sensiolabs.co.uk, what their goals were, how they built it and have kept it running since May 2013, and how Drupal 8 will change the way they design applications for clients going forward.

Drupal 8 + Symfony - "This is what open source is all about"

Part 1 of 2 - I spoke with Richard Miller and Tom Kitchin, software engineers at SensioLabs UK and its parent company Inviqa respectively, via a Google Hangout on Air recently. I wanted to learn more about PHP and Symfony from their perspective and how they think the Drupal 8 and Symfony2 are going to affect each other. In part 2, I learn the inside story on one of the first Drupal 8 sites online, www.sensiolabs.co.uk, what their goals were and how they built it and have kept it running since May 2013, and how Drupal 8 will change the way they design applications for clients going forward.

Do well and do good

This blog post is on purpose, Open Source, profit and pie. This week I had an opportunity to meet Professor Klaus Schwab, Founder and Executive Chairman of the World Economic Forum. I was inspired by the following comment he made (not his exact words):

Open Source Driving Digital Innovation [Feb. 4, 2014]

Submitted on
Tuesday, February 4, 2014
,
Canadian Government Executive

By Todd Akers

The same power of digital communication that is disrupting the commercial marketplace is empowering direct citizen participation in government. Whether enabling on-demand assistance, real-time information, or communications with legislators, much of what is empowering this new wave of citizen participation has its roots in open source.

In the last few years, governments across Canada have turned to flexible open source solutions. Open source software is freely distributed, and its open codebase provides an engine for innovation, as any developer can create improvements and share their work back with the larger community of users.

Municipalities like St. John and Ottawa are using the Drupal open source platform to provide government services online with greater speed and flexibility. Ottawa moved to Drupal in November 2012, introducing a responsive design that enables an optimal experience across mobile devices, tablets and desktops.

Use of Drupal has increased dramatically among provinces and federally, particularly in light of the Open Government Strategy, which encourages federal departments to adopt solutions that promote open information, open data and open government. Open source apps are enabling people to explore the wild, get updated train arrival times, access government research and publications, and bid on government contracts.

The agility that open source provides helps speed government digital initiatives to market. This provides a network effect that’s unmatched, and not limited to a department’s IT team or project budget. With open source, projects can be prototyped and tested inexpensively and quickly, which can help get a public sector site launched in a fraction of the time. In Drupal’s case, more than 30,000 developers have contributed code. That’s why open source can be a critical asset for capturing the opportunities that new technology presents.

Driving innovation
The crowd-sourced efforts of the contributor community are helping improve citizen services. The Web Experience Toolkit is an open source code library developed to help federal departments build websites that are accessible and optimized for mobile devices. Those using the toolkit are standards-compliant and aligned with Treasury Board of Canada Secretariat's Web Standards protocol, which helps them get ahead of the game as Canada.ca seeks to consolidate information and resources with a common, open framework. Health Canada and Statistics Canada recently implemented sites with the toolkit.

DrupalSouth Preview: Technology, Community, a Superhero, and a Homecoming

Sheep ... and the Lord of the Rings movies. That's what typically comes to the minds of most people when they think of New Zealand. Sheep outnumber Kiwi's (the local term for human New Zealanders) roughly seven to one: 4+ million humans, 28+ million sheep. When I was growing up there as a kid, there were more than 50 million sheep, though ...

2013 Greatest Hits – "PHP is as secure as any other major language" – Anthony Ferrara

I met Anthony, aka @ircmaxell, for the first time at the PHP BeNeLux conference in early 2013. He was among the first people I spoke with on mic about PHP. Our conversation about PHP being secure was one of the seeds that grew into the "Power of PHP" series on Acquia.com, though you'll notice we were still calling it "PHP Myths" at the time. The series will be continuing in 2014, stay tuned to the Acquia podcast and the Acquia blog for more!

(Sadly) Not Even Higher Education is Immune to FUD

Acquia CMO Tom Wentworth’s recent post about the unimaginative use of stale FUD by proprietary CMS vendors who try to spook buyers away from open source content management systems was spot on. Not only does this negative message cast doubt on the messenger, but the criticisms of open source are tired and false. They are indeed very 2005 and most competitors have long since moved on.

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