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Don't Reinvent the Wheel, Open Source it

Last week, Tesla’s CEO Elon Musk announced that the company would open source their entire patent portfolio and exemplified how organizations can drive innovation by adopting open source practices and principles throughout their entire businesses - beyond software development.

In particular, Musk highlighted that top human resources – talented, motivated people – are what drive the success of organizations, not patents. Talented people gravitate towards environments that foster innovation and growth, where they’ll have an opportunity to work on new and interesting challenges.

Cathy Theys: Give and get good patch reviews session AND SymfonyCon interview!

In a massive Cathy Theys double-header this week, hear parts rescued from our conversation at SyfonyCon Warsaw, which was plagued by technical difficulties and check out Cathy's insightful session, "Patch Reviews: Get good reviews, give good reviews. Faster." It is full of practical advice to take your contribution to Drupal and open source software to the next level. In the podcast interview, we talk about the opportunities Drupal has given Cathy; some of the benefits of the refactoring that has gone into Drupal 8; joining up with the Symfony community: mutual learning, different styles of contribution, Drupal's new relevance; and the business case for open source contribution and sustainability.

When Digital Marketing Meets Open Source [May 27, 2014]

Submitted on
Tuesday, May 27, 2014
,
Computerworld

By Rohan Pearce

The chief marketing officer of Massachusetts-based Acquia wants to take the open source message to other marketers

It's a product that actually costs nothing, is up against entrenched competitors, and exists in a category that enterprises have in the past been wary of. All in all, marketing open source to marketers was probably never going to be an easy job.

So you might forgive Tom Wentworth if he was a little wary of taking up the role of chief marketing officer at Acquia. But the CMO says that when he received a message from a recruiter asking if he was interested in the position, he jumped at the chance. "I couldn't have dialled back the number faster when I saw him asking about Acquia," Wentworth says.

Wentworth took up the role at Boston-based Acquia about 17 months ago. The company provides software and services based on Drupal: The open source content management system which the federal government has indicated it is likely to standardise on for a whole-of-government CMS.

Although it is Wentworth's first experience at an open source company, he has held marketing roles in other content management software vendors.

Before Acquia, he was CMO at Ektron, and prior to that he was Web solutions evangelist at Interwoven, which was acquired in 2009 by Autonomy — which itself was snapped up by HP in 2011 (a somewhat fraught acquisition.)

"I've been in the content management space for about 15 years now," Wentworth says. He joined Acquia in December 2012.

The decision to join Acquia was a "if you can't beat them, join them", Wentworth says. "As somebody's who's been in the market for so long, I saw the clear shift to open source and I saw the disruption that Drupal was having in the market and really wanted to be a part of it.

"I think when I look at the future of integrated digital experiences and how I see CMOs changing how they adapt digital technology I think Drupal is so strongly suited for that that I had to find a way to get here."

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Is Implementing Continuous Integration Worth It?

Cross-posted with permission from Promet Source

When you start addressing the topic of Continuous Integration (or CI for short) for the first time with an organization or project, there are often some typical questions that arise.

CMO Interview: Marketing Open Source (to Marketers) [April 24, 2014]

Submitted on
Thursday, April 24, 2014
,
CMO

By Rohan Pearce

The CMO of Massachusetts-based Acquia wants to take the open source software message to other marketers

It's a product that costs nothing, is up against entrenched competitors, and exists in a category that enterprises have in the past been wary of. All in all, marketing open source software to other marketers was never going to be an easy job.

So you might forgive Tom Wentworth if he was a little wary of taking up the role of chief marketing officer at Acquia. But the CMO says that when he received a message from a recruiter asking if he was interested in the position, he jumped at the chance. "I couldn't have dialled back the number faster when I saw him asking about Acquia," Wentworth says.

Wentworth took up the role at Boston-based Acquia 17 months ago. The company provides software and services based on Drupal: A well-established, modular open source content management system.

Although it is Wentworth's first experience at an open source company, he has held marketing roles in other content management software vendors for about 15 years. Before Acquia, he was CMO at Ektron, and prior to that he was Web solutions evangelist at Interwoven, which was acquired in 2009 by Autonomy — which itself was snapped up by HP in 2011 (a somewhat fraught acquisition ).

Wentworth joined Acquia in December 2012. The decision was a "if you can't beat them, join them", he says. "As somebody's who's been in the market for so long, I saw the clear shift to open source and I saw the disruption Drupal was having in the market and really wanted to be a part of it.

"When I look at the future of integrated digital experiences and how I see CMOs are changing how they adapt digital technology, I think Drupal is so strongly suited for that and I had to find a way to get here."

Read more:

Open Source Pitfalls - and How to Avoid Them [April 21, 2014]

Submitted on
Monday, April 21, 2014
,
Network World

By Maria Korolov, Network World

It's hard to imagine a company these days that isn't using open source software somewhere, whether it's Linux running a company's print and web servers, the Firefox browser on user desktops, or the Android operating system on mobile devices. In, fact, there are now more than a million different open source projects, according to Black Duck Software, a maker of open source management tools and owner of the Ohloh open source software directory. And open source continues to grow. According to an SAP research report, the number of open source projects roughly doubles every 14 months. But not all open source projects are created equal. According to Ohloh, for the 100,375 projects for which activity information is available, around 80 percent were listed as having low activity, very low activity or were completely inactive...

The success or failure of any particular open source project depends strongly on the community surrounding it – the developers who contribute code, the testers, the documentation writers, the people who answer questions in support forums, and the end users. There are a number of ways to gauge the size and activity level of an open source project's community. Ohloh offers one tool. Another approach is to go to the project's home page or the site where it's hosted and check out the history of code commits and the activity on the discussion boards.

Read more at:

Welcome to the Open Source Renaissance [April 13, 2014]

Submitted on
Sunday, April 13, 2014
,
GigaOM

By Tom Erickson, Acquia CEO

Summary: Ever-popular among developers, open source technology has moved away from the fringes of tech right to the center of the enterprise, thanks to its high level of security and agility.

In the span of just a few years, open source has produced businesses that are incredibly attractive to the investment community. In 2012, open source venture investment jumped 80 percent over the prior year with $553 million invested, compared to $307 million in 2011. VCs have flocked to darlings like MongoDB, Open Stack, Cloudera, Puppet Labs and Hortonworks because these companies are solving incredibly difficult challenges in the cloud and big data arena faster than any proprietary software vendor could.

So why the big increase in interest now? Open source software has been around for years, in many cases implemented on the fringes by developers who prefer the freedom and flexibility of contributing to the evolution of the platforms with which they choose to work. There were even early glimmers of promise; for example, Linux proved to be a fast, effective server platform for many businesses before it grew to be one of the largest open source communities and the third-largest web client operating system in the world.

But today, open source has crossed over from a niche techie outlier to a driving force for businesses.

Read more.

SensioLabs UK - Lessons and chances from Drupal 8 early adoption

Part 2 of 2 - I spoke with Richard Miller and Tom Kitchin, software engineers at SensioLabs UK and its parent company Inviqa respectively, via a Google Hangout on Air recently. Here, I learn the inside story on one of the first Drupal 8 sites online, www.sensiolabs.co.uk, what their goals were, how they built it and have kept it running since May 2013, and how Drupal 8 will change the way they design applications for clients going forward.

Drupal 8 + Symfony - "This is what open source is all about"

Part 1 of 2 - I spoke with Richard Miller and Tom Kitchin, software engineers at SensioLabs UK and its parent company Inviqa respectively, via a Google Hangout on Air recently. I wanted to learn more about PHP and Symfony from their perspective and how they think the Drupal 8 and Symfony2 are going to affect each other. In part 2, I learn the inside story on one of the first Drupal 8 sites online, www.sensiolabs.co.uk, what their goals were and how they built it and have kept it running since May 2013, and how Drupal 8 will change the way they design applications for clients going forward.

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