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Bryan Hirsch, "Helping the Federal Government solve public sector problems with Drupal"

Bryan Hirsch comes from a background of software engineering and political activism. He originally joined Acquia as an engineer on the Drupal Gardens team thanks to his expertise and interest in software-as-a-service products. His new position at Acquia as Senior Technical Consultant Acquia Government Practice Department allows him to leverage his longstanding interest in using open source software in government to save taxpayer dollars, improve civic engagement and government services.

How Governments Market Themselves on the Internet

Originally posted http://www.theworld.org/2012/04/governments-websites/

Alex Gallafent of the BBC examines how countries go about creating their own government web sites to market themselves to their own citizens. Tom Erickson, CEO of Acquia, weights in on how open source software, such as Drupal, has allowed government web sites to be more open for their constituents.

Drupal for government in Dublin

My colleague, Frank Maxwell, and I presented recently at the "OSForum" - open source forum day for local government in Ireland, after that we received emails from people who wanted to know more. It seemed we needed to do something to suit a bigger audience. We helped out on a "Drupal4Gov Day" with Rhoda Kerins of the Local Government Management Agency of Ireland offices in Dublin. Participants ranged from project managers to developers who work for local government at the city and county levels in Ireland.

European public services must follow Iceland's open-source lead

Originally posted: http://www.publicserviceeurope.com/article/1761/european-public-services-must-follow-icelands-open-source-lead

To many in the private sector, the idea of super-size contracts that are expensive to run and almost impossible to break free from seems ludicrous

UK public sector open source adoption falling well behind other major economies [March 23, 2012]

Submitted on
Friday, March 23, 2012
,
Vital Online

The UK Government recently launched an open source toolkit on the Cabinet Office website, to provide a level playing field for open source solutions against traditional proprietary software vendors. But Jim Shaw, general manager for Europe at Acquia believes that cultural barriers and unfounded fears about the technology are holding departments back from making huge savings.

IT industry wants infrastructure, tax breaks and SME support from Budget [March 21, 2012]

Submitted on
Wednesday, March 21, 2012
,
CIO

Chancellor George Osborne will announce the Budget at midday tomorrow, and IT businesses are calling for useful tax breaks and good national infrastructure, with support for small enterprises.

The government needed to ensure the UK has the right technical infrastructure in place to support business growth, according to Morag Lucey, senior VP at converged IT and billing firm Convergys Smart Revenue Solutions.

"We will be specifically hoping that the government finally puts its money where its mouth is and invests more in the rollout of superfast broadband in the UK," she said.

There was "a sizeable gap between the money committed by the public sector and the private sector" for broadband, she said. "There is a questionable commercial case for communications service providers to bridge that gap alone, but absolutely no question as to the societal and economic benefits the UK will reap from universally-available superfast broadband."

Open source software providers also expressed their frustration at the perceived barriers to non-proprietary system adoption, and said the government needed to tackle the problem.

Jim Shaw, general manager for Europe at Acquia, said that in spite of the government recently launching an open source toolkit on the Cabinet Office website in order to provide a level playing field, cultural barriers were holding departments back from making the change.

"An entrenched culture of scepticism against open source adoption is still rife in the public sector and these barriers need to be broken down for the huge range of benefits the technology offers to be realised," he said. In spite of open source systems powering the Cabinet Office website and some DirectGov services, as well as Transport for London's Oystercard using an open source infrastructure, he said, the UK trailed the US and France for adoption.

"With potentially huge savings to be made through efficient public sector IT initiatives, the UK cannot afford to maintain a lukewarm approach to open source adoption."

Small businesses said the Chancellor needed to offer them tax breaks, as well as assisting with effective ways to prevent late payment by their suppliers.

David Ballard, chief executive at IT consultancy Northdoor, said the government needed to consider "lowering the threshold for entrepreneurial relief to encourage a greater distribution of stake ownerships and including smaller owners or employees". He added: "Although there is increasingly generous relief for entrepreneurs, the government has set a 5 percent minimum stake to qualify for ownership."

The Budget needed to reflect the fact that "many of the green shoots we have seen recently have come from smaller businesses, such as the tech start-ups in London's Silicon Roundabout", he added.

The Forum of Private Business said the Chancellor must tackle late payment, as well as provide better information for supporting the new National Loan Guarantee Scheme that is aimed at ensuring businesses can access credit.

"Small business owners are being expected to drive the economy forward yet find that relentless cost increases, mounting late payments and continued credit restrictions severely hinder their ability to control cash flow," said FPB senior policy adviser Alex Jackman. "Cash is the lifeblood of any business and there must be definite action in the Budget if we are to mend this cash flow crisis among small firms."

While the National Loan Guarantee Scheme was "a welcome step towards bringing down the steep cost of lending", Jackman said the UK industry needs "more competition allowing non-bank funders to compete more effectively in small business finance markets dominated by the big banks".

"Particularly, we want support for innovative crowdsourced funding models that are less dependent on automated risk criteria, the over-reliance on these being a central criticism levelled at major lenders in recent years," he said.

Annette Iafrate, managing director at online marketing firm Constant Contact, said access to credit needed to be under a "simple, clear-cut scheme" that operated quickly.

Small businesses could help greatly with national job creation, given the right resources, Ballard at Northdoor said. "I would also like to see a Budget supporting SMEs in developing and deploying their own graduate programmes, which unlike large corporations, have relatively limited resources and experiences in developing such schemes."

Gary Stewart, director at IT and business change organisation Xceed, agreed. "If the government hopes to encourage private businesses to take up the slack of public sector redundancies then they need to give them the tools to become job creators. The restrictions of red tape, regulation, poor availability of credit and tax burdens all need to be stripped back if SMBs are to help bolster economic growth."

Cost cutting: the open source solution? [March 20, 2012]

Submitted on
Tuesday, March 20, 2012
,
Electronics Sourcing

UK Budget Must Encourage Open Source Adoption to Cut Costs - UK public sector open source adoption falling well behind other major economies.

Budget wishlist includes tax changes and more SME support [March 20, 2012]

Submitted on
Tuesday, March 20, 2012
,
Microscope

With the Budget just a day away the industry has made its wishes clear asking the Chancellor to simplify taxes and provide more support for tech start-ups.

In addition there have also been calls for the greater use of open source to cut costs and to reduce VAT back down to 15%.

Some details of what can be expected tomorrow have already emerged with measures to stop those avoiding stamp duty on the agenda along with a potential cut in the 50p tax rate for the highest earners.

But all eyes will be on the taxation measures and support for smaller firms with calls for the national insurance holiday that has been offered to start-ups to be extended to established firms and a simplification of taxation generally.

"The Budget is a real opportunity to remove the growth barriers for small firms created by the complexity of the tax system. It is clearly one that should not be missed," said Phil Orford, chief executive of the Forum of Private Business.

Others wanted more done to help tech start-ups with more help for entrepreneurs willing to take risks.

"As the Chancellor prepares to announce a Budget aimed at stimulating growth, we are all expecting a great focus on macroeconomic policies. However, given that many of the green shoots we have seen recently have come from smaller businesses, such as the tech start-ups in London's Silicon Roundabout, this should be reflected in the Budget," said David Ballard, CEO of Northdoor.

There has also been a call for more adoption of open source to help government cut its own IT costs.

"The government has made huge strides in enabling a fair hearing form open source providers alongside traditional proprietary software vendors in the public sector procurement process, but much more needs to be done," said Jim Shaw, general manager for Europe at Acquia.

Bigger is not always better [Feb 22, 2012]

Submitted on
Wednesday, February 22, 2012
,
CRN

Small technology providers can and should compete more for public sector and enterprise deals, claims Jim Shaw.

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