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Acquia Upgrade Team: Mission Copenhagen

Acquia documentation agent Jam* and I will be heading to Denmark this weekend where we'll be geeking out with Scandanavian Drupallers at the first ever DrupalCamp Copenhagen. You will recognize us by our Acquia shirts and our inability to speak Danish. Our mission is to help you upgrade your Drupal 4 or 5 sites to Drupal 6.

Drupal in the formative stages of adding RDF(a) for Semantic Web

There has been a lot of hand waving about the semantic web, RDF, and Drupal. This is good, and it is important for there to be excitement about the possibilities that this opens to us. Now the first concrete plans are being laid and the first patches are being written and evaluated.

Drupal CMS Founder, Dries Buytaert Interview with CMS Critic

Submitted on
Friday, October 31, 2014
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CMS Critic

We were very pleased to have a chance to interview Dries Buytaert, founder of the legendary Drupal content management system. He shares his thoughts on its success, future and how it came to be in this intriguing and indepth discussion. We had so many questions, that we are only publishing part one while he works on the second half. Here you go.

CC: Thank you for taking the time to speak with us today, Dries. We’d like to cover a few areas during this interview.. specifically Drupal and your latest venture, Acquia.

CC: Can you tell us a little about your background and how you became involved in the world of Content Management Systems?

DB: I was a student at the University of Antwerp in Belgium around 1999. I was doing web development with CGI and server-side includes, but I wanted to learn more about technologies like PHP and MySQL. Also, at the same time, we had the need for an internal messaging system at our student dorm. So, I wrote a simple message board. Then when I graduated, I decided to move my internal message board onto the internet.

CC: Our understanding is that Drupal originally started as a BBS system, having been very involved in the BBS realm ourselves, we find this very interesting. Can you tell us a little bit about how it came to be and was it as popular as a BBS as it is today?

DB: Drupal began as an internal message board that I used to manage my student activities. We just used it in my student dorm to communicate about dinner times, etc. Once I graduated, I began transforming it into a news and discussion website: www.drop.org.

After a year or so, I released the software behind drop.org as Drupal 1.0.0, and Drupal officially came to be on January 15, 2001. Contributors still celebrate this as Drupal’s birthday every year.

Bay Area Drupalcamp 2008 - Testing party and BADCamper party

Last weekend I attended BADCamp. The camp was organized by Tao Starbow, Dan Robinson, Chris Bryant, Dmitri Gaskin, and Jen Lampton. The event was a big success and filled up to capacity with the waiting list closed weeks in advance.

Acquia Launches Comprehensive Partner Program

Leading Drupal solution providers set to deliver solutions based on Acquia Drupal and the Acquia Network

Introducing the Acquia Partner Program

Today we launch the Acquia Partner program with [fourteen partners](/partners/finder) ranging from [sole proprietorships](/partners/showcase/33rd-prime) to [venture-backed firms](/partners/showcase/optaros). I'm excited by the diversity of partners in the program; partnering with different sizes and types of firms will help our customers find the match that maximizes their success. We've been able to enlist parters from [Israel](/partners/showcase/linnovate), the [UK](/partners/showcase/io1-limited), the [US](/partners/showcase/pingvision), and [Canada](/partners/showcase/raincity-studios), with applications pending from other countries in Europe, Asia, and Australia.

The way the web should work

In the Spring of 2007, I teamed up with Partners in Health, a non-profit building hospitals in developing countries. We had a long list of ideas for an intranet and for a new public site and needed a tool with a lot of flexibility. We picked Drupal because of the active community, the growing collection of modules, and the hope that non-engineers could administer the sites. The Partners in Health sites went up fast. In a matter of weeks, people from around the world were downloading and using materials from the sites to help train health workers in rural parts of Africa and Latin America.

Do it with Drupal - New Orleans

On December 12, 2008, I’ll be in New Orleans to talk about the exciting world of Drupal Search. In a first-of-its-kind event, the Lullabots have organized a “large-scale, 3-day learning event” that will bring together some of Drupal’s most sought after speakers, as well as a number of other prominent internet personalities and luminaries. I’m looking forward to meeting some of the speakers who aren’t necessarily known as Drupal rockstars (meaning they did something else to get famous):

Acquia and the Drupal security team

I've been working on the Drupal security team for over three years now. My current role is coordinator of the security team and that means I help to coordinate when releases happen, review security announcements, recruit new members, and review inactive members. The Drupal security team has a highly competent group of developers and they do a good job self organizing and getting security releases out the door. If they get stuck, I may step in and help rally the team or work through some of the non-code issues involved in getting security releases out the door.

InfoWorld Test Center review: Drupal turns pro

Submitted on
Friday, October 31, 2014
,
InfoWorld Test Center

As we've seen time and again, in an increasing number of enterprise software categories, open source has become a promising alternative to commercial software. But there's no free ride.

Support from developers is often problematic, and you need to find products with a large enough following so that programmers have an incentive to build add-on modules. When the Test Center reviewed open source CMSes (content management systems), these two factors often broke the tie between otherwise robust solutions and gave Alfresco the advantage.

Yet if you take support out of the equation, Drupal emerges as the better solution for many enterprise Web projects. That's because this social publishing solution starts with a mature Web CMS, adds a blog system, and then offers discussion forms, community features, and extensibility through 1,800 add-on modules – many of them also open source. Given this flexibility, it's not surprising that Drupal powers about 250,000 live sites – including big names such as Federal Express, The Onion, and Popular Science.

But big organization or small, there's a dark side to Drupal: You'll probably need the services of an experienced support staff or a costly consultancy that has mastered a complex setup and knows how to assemble all the building blocks into a workable system. Now, for those with limited resources, Acquia is stepping in with a commercially supported Drupal distribution along with a network that delivers patches and security updates.

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