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A new kind of Drupalcon session

What is the purpose of sessions at Drupalcon? Why do speakers put in the effort to give them? Why does anyone attend them?

I believe that the purpose of sessions at Drupalcon is to spread knowledge about Drupal. The speakers put in the effort because they genuinely want to teach the material, and people attend because they genuinely want to learn.

Multiple sites per server on Acquia Dev Cloud

When we announced Acquia Dev Cloud at Drupalcon Chicago last month, we said it was primarily designed for professional developers who build and deploy multiples Drupal sites. Today, we are delivering one of the key features behind that promise: the ability to click to create and manage multiple sites on a single Dev Cloud account.

Database Magic on Acquia Hosting

As I discussed in my previous screencast, Drupal site building workflow involves a separate development, staging, and production environment. The different environments use different databases, generally on different database servers since you do not want your testing activities to impact your production site. Traditionally this means you need to juggle multiple Drupal settings.php files containing your database credentials and manually configure database replication and failover yourself.

Importing a Drupal site into Acquia Hosting

Drupal site building often involves moving a site from one environment to another: from a local development environment to a staging server on the web to a full production cluster. This short screencast shows how to export a site from Drupal Gardens and import that site into Acquia Hosting.

The Power of 10%

At Dries' keynote at Drupalcon Copenhagen today, he talked about what the Drupal project might look like in 10 more years, and what it might mean if the project grows by a factor of 10. I'd like to elaborate a bit on his theme by making an analogy with Mozilla Firefox.

Drupal 7: Get Real, Get Dirty, and Get It Done

Yesterday I participated in the Drupal 7 code sprint with a host of excellent people. We made good progress and also talked about the state of the Drupal 7 release. Apparently Moshe and I came to a very similar conclusion about what needs to be done and both decided to blog about it; in fact I stole the title of this post from him.

Module authors: In SQL, don't assume INCREMENT(1) == 2

Trivia question: Suppose you execute the MySQL queries

CREATE TABLE t1 (  id INT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,  n INT NOT NULL,  PRIMARY KEY (id))INSERT INTO t1 (n) VALUES (100)INSERT INTO t1 (n) VALUES (200)

What are the values for the id column in your two rows? If you said "1 and 2", you are in good company but you are mistaken. If you want your module to be good enough to run on Drupal.org or Acquia Hosting some day, keep reading.

Pipe Dream: Geographically Distributed Drupal

The speed of light is, unfortunately, still a constant. If your Drupal site has users in San Francisco, New York, London, Tokyo, Delhi, and Australia (and whose doesn't?), you've had no good way to give all of them fast access to your site. No matter where you put your master database server, most people have to cross an ocean to access it. Perhaps you can put read-only slave databases with local web servers in locations around the world, but then the remote users still have a long haul when they want to log in and create content---which is, after all, what your Drupal site is for.

I am experimenting with an approach to solving this problem that allows users to log in and create content using web and slave database servers that are geographically close to them while maintaining a single consistent Drupal site. It does not require multiple active database master servers and all the intractable problems that causes. My system, called Pipe Dream, intercepts database-changing operations at the remote locations and sends them over a message queue (a.k.a. a pipe) to the primary location where they are replayed.

Venti Drupalccino coming right up! Acquia Hosting's automated provisioning system

Acquia Hosting is designed to be a high performance, high reliability, highly scalable, and highly manageable Drupal hosting infrastructure. Our goal was to be able to quickly provision small and large sites, meet the enormous requirements of Drupal Gardens, and keep all of it running reliably, with a small engineering and operations team. It is easy to say that "the cloud solves all of that," and indeed cloud technology provides a substantial number of benefits.

Reflections on Drupalcon, D7, and DevSeed

I'm in my hotel room after the final day of Drupalcon San Francisco 2010. As always, I had a great time at the conference. I've been so busy building Acquia Hosting for the last year that I lost track of most of what went on with Drupal development in 2009 (except for the Field API project, of course), and I really enjoyed the opportunity to catch up.

My personal Drupalcon experience was largely focused around two new developments:

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