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The way the web should work

In the Spring of 2007, I teamed up with Partners in Health, a non-profit building hospitals in developing countries. We had a long list of ideas for an intranet and for a new public site and needed a tool with a lot of flexibility. We picked Drupal because of the active community, the growing collection of modules, and the hope that non-engineers could administer the sites. The Partners in Health sites went up fast. In a matter of weeks, people from around the world were downloading and using materials from the sites to help train health workers in rural parts of Africa and Latin America.

Acquia and the Drupal security team

I've been working on the Drupal security team for over three years now. My current role is coordinator of the security team and that means I help to coordinate when releases happen, review security announcements, recruit new members, and review inactive members. The Drupal security team has a highly competent group of developers and they do a good job self organizing and getting security releases out the door. If they get stuck, I may step in and help rally the team or work through some of the non-code issues involved in getting security releases out the door.

InfoWorld Test Center review: Drupal turns pro

Submitted on
Friday, April 18, 2014
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InfoWorld Test Center

As we've seen time and again, in an increasing number of enterprise software categories, open source has become a promising alternative to commercial software. But there's no free ride.

Support from developers is often problematic, and you need to find products with a large enough following so that programmers have an incentive to build add-on modules. When the Test Center reviewed open source CMSes (content management systems), these two factors often broke the tie between otherwise robust solutions and gave Alfresco the advantage.

Yet if you take support out of the equation, Drupal emerges as the better solution for many enterprise Web projects. That's because this social publishing solution starts with a mature Web CMS, adds a blog system, and then offers discussion forms, community features, and extensibility through 1,800 add-on modules – many of them also open source. Given this flexibility, it's not surprising that Drupal powers about 250,000 live sites – including big names such as Federal Express, The Onion, and Popular Science.

But big organization or small, there's a dark side to Drupal: You'll probably need the services of an experienced support staff or a costly consultancy that has mastered a complex setup and knows how to assemble all the building blocks into a workable system. Now, for those with limited resources, Acquia is stepping in with a commercially supported Drupal distribution along with a network that delivers patches and security updates.

Web 2.0 New York: Is sales always this much fun?

It's been a couple of weeks since Web 2.0 New York. The event was a success and early reports indicated it exceeded expectations for the event organizers.

For Acquia it was a successful event. We met over 214 people who were running Drupal sites and gave out Acquia t-shirts to each of them until we ran out. We gathered over 400 leads that we qualified as interested in or likely to be building a social publishing site. What was new for Acquia was that those leads were closely followed up by our inside sales team. I'll touch more on that at the end of this post.

Drupal and the $6000 hosting bill, getting to the truth quickly

It's political season here in the United States, and that means it's rumor time. Research has shown that if we are exposed to information as little as eight times we are more likely to believe it. Logic, facts, reason don't necessary apply to our human brains. Political strategist know this, marketers know this and they can use it in influencing you. Journalists know this too.

Acquia launch round up: looking back on a big day

I spent most of the day yesterday reading and participating in Drupal.org threads, blog posts, press articles, forum threads, Twitter feeds, and IRC transcripts of full of conversation about our new product and service offerings.  Here are a few of my favorites:

Press Articles

Acquia Drupal and Acquia Network Subscriptions Now Available

New software bundle, tech support, and network services help developers assemble and operate Web 2.0 sites with confidence on the open source Drupal social publishing system

Talk is silver, code is gold: Acquia's code contributions to the Drupal project

In the Drupal community we have a saying talk is silver and code is gold. For over a year now, members of Acquia have been both talking and coding, and I think it's time to bring some of this to light. In future posts I'll also highlight Acquia involvemnet in Drupal code sprints and other Drupal events, but for now I'll just focus on code.

Drupal Road Warriors Wanted: 17 cities, 6 villages, 3 mountain huts, 12 mountain passes,1 wedding in 8 weeks

I am in the final quarter of a whirlwind 2 months of professional and personal travel. If you love to travel, you might consider joining Acquia's professional services team where travel is not a requirement, it's an opportunity.

Drupal developer Barry Jaspan discusses Acquia

Submitted on
Friday, April 18, 2014
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Linux.com

At the Linuxworld 2008 conference, Drupal developer Barry Jaspan discusses Drupal, development, and the recent formation of Acquia, a software and services company for Drupal. This interview explores the functioning of Drupal and how its development will be complemented by Acquia.

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