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DrupalCon Buzz - Can We Say the "R" word for Drupal 8?

If you are reading this and Drupal 7 is not yet released, pop over to the critical issue queue and roll, review, or comment on a patch before you go any further!

Simpleviews on Drupal 7 - how we did it

Early on in the development of Drupal Gardens, it was clear that we needed some type of simple Views-like functionality. You know, letting users set up simple lists of content beyond what is included with Drupal 7 core, but simpler than the Views UI which can be quite intimidating to first-time users. Drupal Gardens' goals include making Drupal easy to use, and that sometimes comes with feature sacrifices. You cannot do everything you could do with a self-hosted solution, but you can do most things easier.

How Acquia keeps aHEAD of Drupal 7

When we (Acquia) started planning our hosted Drupal service (Drupal Gardens) a year ago we had to take the call of developing in Drupal 7 or Drupal 6.  I don't think this was ever really in doubt, but the decision to try to build a product on Drupal 7 core at that stage was certainly a risky one. Why? there were almost no contributed modules or themes and the architecture and APIs were changing daily. Acquia's business is squarely Drupal.  Drupal support, Drupal promotion, Drupal hosting, Drupal polish, Drupal architecture, Drupal Drupal Drupal (you know the song).  So even though this was a risk, we knew that the benefits to Drupal and Acquia would be too great to back down from it.

Social Publishing in the Enterprise: Industry Case studies from Drupalcon to convince your technical executives

For Drupalcon San Francisco I lead the "Leveraging Drupal for your Business" track. Within the track there was a "Social Publishing in the Enterprise" sub-track designed to tell the story of how enterprises are succeeding with Drupal.

How we trained 120 people to be core contributors at the Drupalcon sprints

In my previous post on Drupalcon innovations I addressed how we, the Drupalcon organizers, added a sprint before Drupalcon when contributors are passionate and well rested. This was one important part of growing the Drupal community. In this blog post I'll explain a larger strategy of how the community is training new community members to use quality assurance tools to improve Drupal sites.

7 conference innovations that helped make Drupalcon San Francisco a success

On the last night of Drupalcon DC last year, I was at a bar with some of my friends from San Francisco. We were talking about what a great conference DCDC was. The drinks were flowing and we started throwing around ideas for Drupalcon San Francisco. Even though I was the organizer of Drupalcon Boston, I live and continue to work in San Francisco and I wanted a conference in my city.

Reflections on Drupalcon, D7, and DevSeed

I'm in my hotel room after the final day of Drupalcon San Francisco 2010. As always, I had a great time at the conference. I've been so busy building Acquia Hosting for the last year that I lost track of most of what went on with Drupal development in 2009 (except for the Field API project, of course), and I really enjoyed the opportunity to catch up.

My personal Drupalcon experience was largely focused around two new developments:

Drupal Gardens update - helping the designer

Yesterday we completed our pre-DrupalCon sprint and are excited to introduce several great new features, with a special focus on designers and site creators who need an awesome looking site. Specifically in this release we have added great support for professional fonts. As designers know, font selection is one key area where average web sites are separated from remarkable sites. In the past, font options for web sites were limited or complex to implement: you could create your own images with embedded expensive licensed fonts, or you could purchase, install and embed fonts yourself.

Advanced Apache Solr Example: IP-based Access

In the run-up to our talk "Apache Solr Search Mastery" at Drupalcon San Francisco, we decided that we would not have time to really cover all the advanced topics in the session. So we're going to put up a couple blog posts before hand to invite some discussion and encourage people to dig into the code ahead of time and then we can take questions at the end of the session or during a BoF.

This first post describes the elements of a module that implements a customized IP-address-based scheme for access control on Solr searches. It's a simplified version of the sort of access controls that some universities or companies use to only show (for example) journal articles purchased under license via a website for the library where the license restricts access to students or employees who are on-site. The attached module demonstrates how such a scheme for controlling which nodes appear in search results can be implemented. The code there should be contrasted with the code in the apachesolr_nodeaccess module.

Minimizing maintenance time while updating thousands of Drupal Gardens sites

In Drupal Gardens 2 month update Chris wrote about a number of the improvements to Drupal Gardens in our last sprint. I want to focus on our solution for a system that now lets us perform Gardens site upgrades with only a couple minutes of maintenance (site offline) time per site when running database updates. The problem was made a little more difficult by the custom domain feature that was also going live, so each Drupal site (database) might be referenced by multiple sites directories. I describe here the solution we worked out, which involves using Drush, the (internal) Acquia Hosting APIs, and communication with the http://www.drupalgardens.com/ site so that each site in our multi-site installs could be seamlessly moved between two different versions of Drupal 7.

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