Acquia Coverage

Drupal 8 to Take Open Source CMS 'to the Next Level' [Dec. 19, 2013]

Submitted on
donderdag, 19 december 2013
,
Computerworld

By Rohan Pearce

Drupal's project lead, Dries Buytaert, earlier this month outlined the criteria for a beta release of the next version of the open source CMS: Drupal 8. D8 hit alpha in mid-2013.

Version 8 of Drupal incorporates dramatic changes for many of aspects the CMS, with improvements ranging from integrated WYSIWYG content creation and in-line editing, to support for responsive design 'out of the box' and multi-language support.

"I would love to see Drupal 8 in the middle of next year," Buytaert told Computerworld Australia.

"We've been saying 'it's ready when it's ready'," he added. "So what that means for us is when there are no critical bugs left. I track the number of incoming critical bugs versus the number of outgoing critical bugs. Basically how many new critical bugs are reported versus how many we fixed — and the number's pretty steady, meaning we do a good job fixing them but there's still some bugs coming in as people download the alphas and try things.

"They try to upgrade a module, for example. And sometimes it's not just bugs but also when people try to implement against one of the new APIs. Sometimes they'll say 'What the hell is this?' or 'It could be made easier this way.'"

Acquia Won't Rush IPO [Dec. 19, 2013]

Submitted on
maandag, 30 december 2013
,
Computerworld

By Rohan Pearce

Boston-based Web technology company Acquia is heading towards an IPO but it's in no rush to go public according to Dries Buytaert, Acquia's co-founder and the creator of the open source CMS Drupal.

"For us [an IPO] is something that we're working on but it's not front and centre right now," Buytaert, the CTO of the Drupal services firm, said.

"We think it's a key milestone, but it's only just that as well: It's a milestone in a much longer path to building a significant independent company. So that's the reason I say we're not obsessed with it."

Earlier this year, the company hired Dennis Morgan as CFO, which is "obviously a key component for being able to do an IPO," the CTO added.

"In general we want to be an IPO-ready company such that we have the luxury to file for an IPO if we were to choose to," Buytaert said.

Growing A Mo: Lessons Learned From The Movember Project [Dec 19, 2013]

Submitted on
donderdag, 19 december 2013
,
MediaPost

By Bryan House

Were any of your colleagues or friends sporting awkward moustaches until recently? If so, it’s likely they were among the thousands of Mo-Bros taking part in the worldwide Movember movement committed to raising funds and awareness for men’s health, specifically prostate cancer and other cancers that affect men. Those awkward moustaches were unavoidable at my office. My company has been an active and proud participant for the past four years; last month more than 80 participants and hundreds of contributors helped raise $38,000 as part of Acquia’s "Mo Drupal" team this year.

The success of Movember is no fluke. From its founding a decade ago in Melbourne, the Movember moustache has expanded to more than two dozen countries. In fact, it’s the simple act of growing a moustache that has encouraged several hundred thousand men around the world to become walking billboards for the — quite literal — face of men’s health, an extremely successful strategy that has helped the annual fundraiser gain momentum. These “Mo Bros” (and their ever-supportive and patient Mo Sistas) raise awareness by prompting private and public conversations about men’s health. They also raise an amazing amount of funds for programs that support men’s health initiatives; Movember donations this year surpassed $106 million worldwide.

According to Mark Hedstrom, the U.S. director for the effort, “Movember is about getting men to engage in a fun and somewhat irreverent campaign. By supporting a fun environment, men start engaging more in their personal health.”

So how has the Movember Foundation had so much success engaging such a vast group of men? Let’s take a look at the top three things: language, competition and keeping it fun.

Inside the Road to Acquia's Possible IPO [Dec. 11, 2013]

Submitted on
woensdag, 11 december 2013
,
CMSWire

By Scott Raynovich

The open-source model for software is shaking up the Web Content Management System (CMS) business. One company that has greatly benefited from this is Acquia, one of the Boston area's most successful startups. Co-founded by Drupal's creator in 2007, Acquia has doubled its revenues in each of the last two years and sparked chatter of a US initial public offering (IPO) in 2014.

The Burlington, Mass.-based startup's savvy move to pick Drupal, the open-source CMS development platform, takes a page out of the Red Hat Software book. That model leverages the speed and flexibility of an open-source community while providing the service and support infrastructure to reassure enterprise customers who want to make sure the software is mission-critical.

While in Boston last week, several sources in the startup and venture capital (VC) community identified Acquia as one of the leading IPO candidate for 2014. On the record, nobody affiliated with Acquia will confirm an IPO is in the works. Despite the chatter, VCs never want to talk about an IPO, but that's usually on an agenda — cash and liquidity for investors and insiders is always welcome when you can get it

Michael Skok, an Acquia investor and board member and a partner with North Bridge Venture Partners, wouldn't confirm any imminent IPO plans. But he did confirm the company's solid business model is linked hand-in-hand with Drupal's growth.

"We, as investors, Tom Erickson (the CEO of Acquia), and the team at Acquia are all committed to building an enduring business for the long-term," Skok wrote in an email in response to questions. "They continue to build a strong foundation for future growth fueled by massive digital disruption as organizations of all sizes scramble to keep up with the speed of the web."

Step Aside Coding, It's Time to Embrace the Assembled Web [Dec. 9, 2013]

Submitted on
maandag, 9 december 2013
,
Forbes

By Dries Buytaert

To "assemble" means to build. Assembling also means that we come together. Sometimes, both aspects are true. When that happens and we work together to build, we are better off for it.

The open source community is a perfect example of this. When Linux creator Linus Torvalds spoke about how it felt to get contributions from a worldwide network of people, he remarked "I had hoisted myself up on the shoulders of giants". I'm lucky enough to feel the same way.

The Internet has created a culture of sharing, letting people connect and collaborate on areas of common interest. When I started developing Drupal in 2000 from my university dormitory in Antwerp, I never imagined I'd build a network of people who were interested in building a content management system with me. Yet word of my project spread, and before I knew it, I was getting contributions to my project from around the world. Soon I also was standing on the shoulders of giants.

HP Launches Portal to Sell Its Software Online [Dec. 6, 2013]

Submitted on
Vrijdag, 6 december 2013
,
eWeek

By Sean Michael Kerner

Hewlett-Packard's Pronq is a new business set to directly sell HP software, including security, performance and business analytics.

Hewlett-Packard is now ramping up a new effort to sell its software online. The new HP Pronq effort is not set to be officially announced until next week, though the site is now live. The Pronq portal currently offers HP's Fortify on Demand security service, Agile Manager, Vertica, Performance Anywhere and Service Anywhere solutions.

"Pronk" is an actual word that is defined as jumping up into the air or moving forward by leaps and bounds, Caroline Tsay, vice president of Web and eCommerce at HP's Software division, told eWEEK. "It's a metaphor for what we're trying to do with Pronq, with the attributes of agility and ease of use," Tsay said.

As to how and why HP chose to start with five offerings to sell on Pronq, Tsay said the initial set has the right price points and offers the ability to try the products before buying them. Over time, other products will be added and both software as a service (SaaS) as well as on-premises solutions will be part of the mix.

5 Experiences Commerce Websites Should Replicate from the Apple Store [Dec. 6, 2013]

Submitted on
maandag, 30 december 2013
,
The Next Web

By Tom Wentworth, Acquia CMO

Whether you’re an Android or iOS user, we’ve all probably made our way into an Apple store at some point. After pushing past the suspiciously friendly blue-shirted door greeters, the in-store experience is actually quite pleasant. It’s a far cry from what you’d expect from a massive consumer goods retailer; people actually seem to be enjoying themselves in the stores and are eager to come back.

Unlike big-box retailers who couldn’t care less about which products you buy (as long as you buy something), Apple controls its brand message and experience within its stores. The result is a unique brand engagement that’s a win for both the Apple name and the consumer. This is exactly the experience Apple intends.

Apple has largely been successful in creating an in-store shopping experience that’s as simple, dynamic, and stress-free as a visit to its online store. While brick-and-mortar retailers are seemingly shutting their doors left and right, Apple stores seem to keep popping up around the world.

That got us thinking: what tactics did Apple implement in some of its physical stores that every retailer and brand can adopt? Here’s a list of five

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2013 Critic's Choice Award for Best Free CMS [Dec. 5, 2013]

Submitted on
donderdag, 5 december 2013
,
CMS Critic

By Mike Johnson

Within the CMS industry, we are very fortunate. Every year, thousands of developers work their fingers to the bone to deliver highly capable free CMS to the market. When it comes to selection, the CMS industry is definitely not hurting for choices. For this reason, selecting a winner for the Best Free CMS award has been a tough decision. What it has come down to, however, is the flexibility and capability of the platform.

In the end, when it comes to being flexible, it would be foolish to select any other CMS on the market. For a free content management system to be as capable and widely used in such an incredibly amount of environments is nothing short of amazing and without further adieu, we're pleased to announce the winner of the 2013 Critic's Choice Award for Best Free CMS goes to...

Drupal
One of the most flexible content management systems available for free today, Drupal is a powerhouse that can be used to power all kinds of different platforms. It's so flexible that it is often discounted as a CMS and referred to strictly as a Content Management Framework.

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Breaking Bad Habits in IT: Avoid the Suite Trap [Dec. 2, 2013]

Submitted on
maandag, 2 december 2013
,
CMSWire

By Tom Wentworth

It’s time to break some bad habits. Fifteen years ago, CIOs bought into expensive technology suites that offered a “one stop shop” for every digital project on their agenda. These suites consolidated a range of applications into one package, offered by a large vendor like Oracle, SAP or IBM. But these “one stop shops” proved to be a bad investment. Individual applications rolled into suites became old news, and CIOs found themselves locked into their investments while companies like Salesforce.com and Workday took a majority of the market share away from applications in suites.

And now history is repeating itself …

CIO budgets are shifting toward the CMO, encouraging large marketing technology providers to recreate the types of suites big tech companies introduced years ago, targeted specifically to CMOs. These large packages pieced together from individual applications that guide every process of planning, creating and implementing marketing campaigns do not offer the dynamic solution marketers need in today’s digital age.

America's Fastest Growing Enterprise Software Companies of 2013 [Nov. 30, 2013]

Submitted on
zaterdag, 30 november 2013
,
Forbes

By Louis Columbus

Earlier this month Deloitte published the 2013 Technology Fast 500™, their annual ranking of the fastest growing life sciences, media, software, technology, telecommunications and clean technology companies in North America. The winners are selected based on the percentage fiscal year revenue growth from 2008 to 2012, and for the eighteenth consecutive year, software is leading all industries.

To review the 2013 Technology Fast 500™ eligibility requirements and methodology please see this document. You can find a copy of the Winner’s Brochure here and the complete list here. The following infographic also summary of the key findings of the 2013 Technology Fast 500 Rankings.

Reason To Be Thankful: Being Named A Fast-Growing Tech Company [Nov. 27, 2013]

Submitted on
woensdag, 27 november 2013
,
SemanticWeb.com

By Jennifer Zaino

It’s got to be a happy Thanksgiving for a number of tech companies that made their way to Deloitte’s recently-released Technology Fast 500. The 2013 ranking of the fastest-growing tech companies based in North America also has something to show for anyone who’s doubted that there’s money to be made taking advantage of semantic and other Web 3.0 concepts, a look at the list should show it’s time for the doubting to stop.

Have a look at some of the winners with their overall rankings:

#2 Acquia. Drupal claims the title of being the first mainstream content management system to support semantic web technology in its core. The Drupal-powered project Acquia was co-founded by Drupal creator Dries Buytaert to provide cloud, SaaS, and other services to organizations building websites on Drupal – and has on staff software engineer Stéphane Corlosquet, who had a big hand in bringing those semantic capabilities to Drupal’s core. In fact, Corlosquet spoke at the most recent SemTechBiz about Acquia as an example of a Drupal-powered project managing its content as Linked Data.

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How A Dorm Room Project Became Acquia, the Web's Go-To Content Management System [Nov. 25, 2013]

Submitted on
maandag, 25 november 2013
,
Inc. Magazine

By Doug Cantor

As a grad student in computer science at the University of Antwerp in the early 2000s, Dries Buytaert began fiddling with what he thought was a fun side project: an open-source software platform that could support all kinds of websites. He called the system Drupal--Dutch for "droplet"--and figured no more than a dozen people ever would use it.

Buytaert graduated in 2007. But unlike his fellow grads, he didn’t have to look for a job. It turned out that his modest side project had captured enough users and buzz to be the basis of a business.

So Buytaert partnered with Jay Batson, a Boston tech entrepreneur he'd met at a conference, and founded founded Acquia, which provides service and support for websites built on the Drupal content-management system. They set up shop in Burlington, Massachusetts, the better to tap into Boston's deep well of tech talent. Tom Erickson, a former executive at the digital mapping company Tele-Atlas, joined the business as a board member in the first year and now serves as CEO, while Buytaert keeps his focus squarely on the technology.

Five years later, Acquia has clients in 25 countries, and has built websites for clients including Twitter and Intel. It’s appeared on the Inc. 500 list two years in a row, landing at No. 109 in 2013; 2012 revenue hit $45.4 million.) It now has more than 400 employees, offices in Germany, Sweden, Belgium, and Singapore, and investors like Goldman Sachs, Accolade Partners, and Investor Growth Capital.

A more astonishing fact: Drupal now provides the backbone for more than 2 percent of all of the sites on the Internet. For that reason alone, Inc. considered the founders of Acquia are strong candidates for 2013's entrepreneur of the year.

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5 Reasons for the Boston Tech/Innovation Community To Be Thankful This Week [Nov. 25, 2013]

Submitted on
maandag, 25 november 2013
,
VentureFizz

By Dennis Keohane

There is so much to be thankful for as Thanksgiving approaches this Thursday, especially as the robust tech ecosystem in Boston continues to trend upwards. Here is our list of a few specific things to appreciate as part of Boston's startup/innovation community this week.

Things are Going Great in Boston

The Startup Community should be really excited about what is going on these days in town. Not only because there seems to be more and more (sometimes surprising) funding announcements; not only because some "pillar" companies are stepping into the "public" consciousness and leading the next wave of Boston companies by sharing their experience and re-investing their dollars; not only because some of Boston's mobile app and e-commerce companies are expanding rapidly; but, because there is an almost palpable spirit of cooperation, widespread mentorship, and "all-in", familial mentality that is coursing through the city like never before.

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Top 5 Ways To Boost Holiday Sales By Leveraging The Web Site [Nov. 11, 2013]

Submitted on
maandag, 11 november 2013
,
Retail TouchPoints

By Kelly O'Neill

It’s that time of year again when brands and retailers work to find the best way to market a product to drive the greatest amount of sales during the holiday season. But this year is different: limited retail floor space combined with consumers’ demand for more information in real-time has presented an opportunity for brands to create a direct-to-consumer connection, one that can inspire greater brand loyalty and drive more sales.

But how can this be done? With their web sites.

Believe it or not, a brand’s web site has greater influence on sales and brand loyalty than most people think. When the web site is designed correctly — delivering a seamless integration of content, social interaction and commerce opportunities that customers look for — the potential to inspire greater loyalty, engagement and sales increases significantly.

Here are the top five ways brands can better leverage their web sites this holiday season to drive sales and increase the direct-to-consumer relationship.

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Tech Sector Throws Lunchtime Dance Party [Nov. 7, 2013]

Submitted on
donderdag, 7 november 2013
,
The Boston Globe

By Callum Borchers

It’s lunch time in the Innovation District, so of course it’s time to paper over the windows, hang the strobe lights, and crank up the music.

Welcome to the new power lunch in Boston, about as far as you can get from the cushy banquettes of the downtown dining salons, where a buttoned-down waiter recommends the baked scrod and two guys in suits discuss weekend golf.

Instead, Lunch Beat Boston style is an amped-up dance hour, where the Seaport’s District Hall is turned into a darkened disco, and techies groove to thumping electronica so loud that networking becomes, by necessity, a wordless bounce to the beat with your neighbor.

Lunch Beat — a global franchise that started three years ago in the electronic dance music hub of Stockholm — is a noontime rave intended to break up the work routine with a midday jolt of techno tunes. Organizers in Greater Boston held their fourth such rave Wednesday at District Hall, the newly erected center of the city’s budding Innovation District.

“A lot of young people don’t want to just work and go home,” said Dries Buytaert, cofounder of Acquia, a software company that cosponsored the event. “They want to be part of something. They want to have an experience, so having some fun matters. It matters because it gives you a sense of purpose and makes work not just work.

“Technology people often come across as reserved, but I think they’re the first ones to drop their guards in an atmosphere like this,” Buytaert added.

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Ready for Launch: Five Steps for a Successful Go-Live [Nov. 4, 2013]

Submitted on
maandag, 4 november 2013
,
IT Business Edge

By Kim Wright

The launch of healthcare.gov has brought a tidal wave of criticism. Some say the code was buggy, others blame the servers, and still others blame the user experience. While we may not be able to pinpoint exactly what went wrong, one thing is certain: What should have been a great day for many Americans became the worst day for the technology providers behind healthcare.gov.

But healthcare.gov isn’t the only site to experience a bad launch day; it just happens to be the latest example of how a site that goes live before it’s ready can cause more harm than good. When we only look at technology projects in terms of code and hardware, we are setting ourselves up for failure. Technology projects should support the people, the projects, and the objectives of the mission they are being built to support.

With that in mind, Jessica Richmond, senior director of Government Professional Services at Acquia, has put together some tips for site developers to ensure that when a site gets the green light to go live, it’s ready for peak performance, regardless of the amount of traffic it may experience.

Announcing the 50 on Fire Finalists for Marketing & Advertising [Nov. 1, 2013]

Submitted on
Vrijdag, 1 november 2013
,
BostInno

There's a glow in Boston right now. Not only are Halloween jack o'lanterns illuminating our city streets, but the glory of a historic Red Sox World Series victory is igniting the Hub, fueling what is sure to be days of celebrations.

But we here at BostInno are about to add more fire to a city already hot with hometown pride.

The time has come to name finalists for BostInno’s second 50 on Fire. After months of anticipation and a grueling selection process, thousands of nominations have been narrowed down to less than 200. These are the extraordinary companies and individuals who burn brighter than the rest. They are the newsmakers, forward-thinkers, and innovators undeniably setting the scene aflame. Check out all the 50 on Fire Finalists here.

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What Caused HealthCare.gov To Collapse? [Oct. 30, 2013]

Submitted on
woensdag, 30 oktober 2013
,
Greater Boston

Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebellius testified before Congress for hours on Wednesday, saying she should be held accountable for the failures of the Affordable Care Act's website since it debuted on October 1.

That, while President Barack Obama was winging his way to Boston to tout the benefits of the Affordable Care Act, in spite of the website's rocky rollout. Faneuil Hall is where then-Massachusetts Governor Mitt Romney signed health care into law in 2006.

Greater Boston was joined by two who make a living overseeing website rollouts: Richard Banfield, the CEO of the web development firm Fresh Tilled Soil, and Chris Comparato, an executive at the cloud-based software company Acquia.

Why Healthcare.gov Had a Troubled Debut [Oct. 17, 2013]

Submitted on
donderdag, 17 oktober 2013
,
Fedscoop

As millions flocked to healthcare.gov to research insurance options and sign up for plans under the Affordable Care Act, many experienced major issues with the site — problems that have only increased in the two weeks since the site opened for business...

Todd Akers, vice president of public sector at Acquia, said when rolling out projects of this scale, it is crucial to ensure there’s a defined goal.

“Having a strong relationship with the development team will mean the best possible outcome for the project,” he said. “You need to iterate on the critical tasks. Too often, you see projects lose focus on the goal, and overall delivery quality can be reduced.”

The health care act is different because unlike similar projects, it is mandated by law. According to a congressional staffer familiar with the issue and who spoke on background, the deadline established by the law made the website launch more complicated.

Drupal's on Steroids and It's Disrupting the Enterprise [Oct. 17, 2013]

Submitted on
donderdag, 17 oktober 2013
,
New Media

DENVER, Oct. 17, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Imagine one of the largest school districts in the country reducing their software costs from $90 a student to $1 per student. By creating a complete set of applications built on Drupal, and replacing or repurposing licensed tools, the district would be able to reduce 50+ different applications down by over half, while simultaneously adding substantial new features and functionality, all with a single, main interface for 800,000 students and 84 schools. With one Drupal platform there is less maintenance, less training needed, and fewer updates… plus, an ongoing savings of millions of dollars a year.

Web development companies like NewMedia in Denver are putting Open Source tools like Drupal on steroids to create transformative enterprise solutions for school districts, state governments, and large companies. They are pushing the boundaries of where Drupal can go in the enterprise and changing how business looks at open source software.

Steve Morris, Director of Business Development at NewMedia says, "Drupal itself cannot run a billion dollar enterprise, but it can link together and control the things that do and interface many of those things along the way. It can be a stand-alone entity that does things all by itself or a connector for five other entities, so they can all work together. It can be a controller of five other entities and run them all at once, by modifying it in new and previously unintended ways. That's the flexibility of Drupal."

NewMedia has been pumping up recent projects with Drupal both as a framework and/or a component for complex enterprise needs:
- The University of Colorado was introduced to Drupal when NewMedia redeveloped their 7000 page static website with it, and the experience has dramatically changed how CU operates its websites ever since. What used to take 5 full-time people to maintain, now takes one person 20 hours per week, and CU has gone on to become a recognized leader in Drupal among educational groups.

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