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leadership

Dries Buytaert Named to Boston Business Journal's 40 Under 40 [Oct. 17, 2014]

Submitted on
vendredi, le 17 octobre 2014h
,
Boston Business Journal

Dries Buytaert is a passionate believer in what he calls "the open-source way."

For Buytaert, the co-founder and CTO of Acquia in Burlington, and president of the Drupal Foundation — meant to expand use of the open-source platform he began to create at the age of 19 — the ripple effects of embracing open collaboration go well beyond business and government applications of technology.

"The collaboration of open-source communities has the power to raise the bar for all participants," said Buytaert. "The innovation that's generated by contributors can be widely shared and enjoyed, particularly for those who would otherwise be at a disadvantage. With Drupal, the same technology that's powering customer experiences for Global 2000 organizations is readily available for the next great startup. And emerging nations benefit from the innovation of more than 130 countries that use Drupal for their government sites."

WhiteHouse.gov and many of the busiest government websites globally have been built on the Drupal platform, and Buytaert's evangelism has led thousands of developers worldwide to help create new ways of managing and displaying content using the technology. Currently, he's helping to steer work on Drupal 8, which will leverage new technologies for mobile data display and other updates to "set a new standard for ease of use."

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Tom Erickson of Acquia, on the Philosophy of ‘Ready, Fire, Aim’ [March 30, 2014]

Submitted on
Dimanche, le 30 mars 2014h
,
The New York Times

Corner Office, By Adam Bryant

This interview with Tom Erickson, chief executive of Acquia, an open-source software company, was conducted and condensed by Adam Bryant.

Any leadership lessons early in your life?

I grew up in a very small town in Wisconsin, a classic Scandinavian town where it wasn’t encouraged to brag. My father was a leader just by virtue of his personality. He ran a store that’s still in the family. He was president of the City Council, president of the school board, and was a leader of the business association. He was one of those quiet leaders who just did his thing.

He had a very different leadership style than me, because he was blessed with a patience that I don’t have. He was able to help people, over an extended period, think about things differently. We were one of the very first schools in our part of the state to receive a computer. My dad had been really active about saying, “We need to be on the forefront of what’s next.” I glued myself to that computer.

What about early management experience?

I got a job out of university with a small company called PSDI. I had eight other job offers, but I chose them because they said, “You’ll be promoted if you work hard.” Within a year, they sent me to Australia to open an office there. I was 23.

I was a technical guy with an engineering background, but I learned how to sell there. That was probably a pivotal point in my career — learning that it wasn’t magic. Coming from a small town, I just assumed that there were certain tracks in life, and that moving across them was hard. But I learned that I could sell.