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Acquia Update: Network Services and Drupal Certification

Submitted on
mercredi, le 18 juin 2008h
,
CMSWire

Acquia presented at the Enterprise 2.0 conference in Boston last week, and Jeff Whatcott, who manned the Acquia stand, writes in a blog entry that most of the corporate types swinging past his booth had no idea what Drupal was.

Acquia’s mission, or course, is about changing all that, and making the open source Social Publishing (… as they insist on calling it…) platform a viable Enterprise content management/community product. If you remember, the company told us at Drupalcon Boston in March how they intend to achieve that. The first step consists of professional wrapping of the Drupal product, and will come in the shape of the subscription-based ‘Carbon’ product. Carbon consists of Drupal 6.x core and about 30 modules, some of which have been developed by the Drupal community and then vetted and tested by Acquia, with a sprinkling of modules developed by the company itself. The result is calculated to be analogous to a Red Hat enterprise subscription; a cast-iron, bug-free and supported version of a community-built product.

The second major product announcement in March was ‘Spokes’, and is a network service. Spokes will offer subscribers automatic updates, security updates and patches, personalized alerts and other remote services.

We were wondering how things were progressing along these lines, so we talked with Director of Marketing Bryan House, and got a progress report and picked up some details on upcoming products. The good new is that things are on schedule for the announced Fall launch of the company’s first products. The (ever-growing) Acquia team is beavering away on building the eCommerce store, on Network Services and on testing and packaging for the Carbon product. We talked about some cool new ideas for Acquia’s network services, and about a whole new departure for Acquia: Drupal certification and training.

Gilbane

I'm in San Francisco this week to sing the Drupal gospel at the Gilbane conference. I take part in a panel discussion called Social Technologies for Ad Hoc Information Sharing. Also on the panel will be John Newton, co-founder and CTO of Alfresco, and Michael Wechner, president of Wyona.

Acquia Podcast 1: Interview with David Mercer

Welcome to the inaugural episode of the Acquia Podcast series. In this podcast, Acquians Robert Douglass and Bryan House interview David Mercer, author of the new Packt Publishing book - Building powerful and robust websites with Drupal 6.

Indéfini

Acquia Expands Technical Team

Prominent open source contributors and industry veterans join social publishing pioneer

Need your vote - Acquia round 2 video @ Enterprise 2.0 Launchpad

Thanks to everyone who voted for Acquia in the first round of Enterprise 2.0's people's choice (aka American Idol) contest for their Launchpad event. We received 80 votes in the first round and made it to Round 2. The top 4 vote getters in Round 2 will present on stage at the Enterprise 2.0 Conference.

Please take a moment to view & vote for Acquia's 2nd round video.

The DX Files: Improving Drupal Developer Experience

I am declaring a personal crusade to improve Drupal’s “Developer Experience,” which I hereby abbreviate as “DX.”

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Acquia Makes Drupal Community Building Accessible

Submitted on
jeudi, le 18 decembre 2014h
,
The AppGap

Many companies are now looking to build communities outside the firewall to engage customers, suppliers, and prospects, as well as create communities inside the enterprise to engage employees on key topics. I have written about several new approaches to supporting communities on this blog and Fast Forward. Drupal has been around a long time in web years as a community platform. I first heard about it in 2004. Acquia was recently formed to make Drupal more accessible and provide professional support.

Selling open-source 'ice' to the eskimos

Submitted on
jeudi, le 18 decembre 2014h
,
The Open Road

Savio Rodrigues of InfoWorld tries to parse what makes open-source buyers tick, and how to generate more of them. In so doing, he suggests that the real battleground is over those enterprises with both money and expertise to go it alone with open-source software (so-called "Category B" customers).

Why should they bother buying support when they can self-support?

For me, this isn't the right question. Using his MySQL-derived customer classification system, the real question is, "Can proprietary software serve Category A (companies with more time than money) at all?" and "Can open source more efficiently serve Categories B and C too?"

Money versus time in Open Source

I think Sun/MySQL's Marten Mickos nailed it when he said "There's a difference between organizations that have more time than money and organizations that have more money than time". Read Savio Rodrigues' post on InfoWorld and Matt Asay's post on CNET for more background.

Vote for Acquia @ Enterprise 2.0 Launch Pad

<p>Acquia is participating in another <a href="http://launchpad.enterprise2conf.com/">Launch Pad</a> event, this time for the <a href="http://www.enterprise2conf.com/">Enterprise 2.0 conference</a>. For this Launch Pad event, technology companies were asked to submit a one-minute video pitch to be voted on by the Enterprise 2.0 community. There will be multiple rounds, with four companies eventually on stage at the Enterprise 2.0 conference to present and demonstrate in front of a live audience.</p>

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