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Drupal's on Steroids and It's Disrupting the Enterprise [Oct. 17, 2013]

Submitted on
jeudi, le 17 octobre 2013h
,
New Media

DENVER, Oct. 17, 2013 /PRNewswire/ -- Imagine one of the largest school districts in the country reducing their software costs from $90 a student to $1 per student. By creating a complete set of applications built on Drupal, and replacing or repurposing licensed tools, the district would be able to reduce 50+ different applications down by over half, while simultaneously adding substantial new features and functionality, all with a single, main interface for 800,000 students and 84 schools. With one Drupal platform there is less maintenance, less training needed, and fewer updates… plus, an ongoing savings of millions of dollars a year.

Web development companies like NewMedia in Denver are putting Open Source tools like Drupal on steroids to create transformative enterprise solutions for school districts, state governments, and large companies. They are pushing the boundaries of where Drupal can go in the enterprise and changing how business looks at open source software.

Steve Morris, Director of Business Development at NewMedia says, "Drupal itself cannot run a billion dollar enterprise, but it can link together and control the things that do and interface many of those things along the way. It can be a stand-alone entity that does things all by itself or a connector for five other entities, so they can all work together. It can be a controller of five other entities and run them all at once, by modifying it in new and previously unintended ways. That's the flexibility of Drupal."

NewMedia has been pumping up recent projects with Drupal both as a framework and/or a component for complex enterprise needs:
- The University of Colorado was introduced to Drupal when NewMedia redeveloped their 7000 page static website with it, and the experience has dramatically changed how CU operates its websites ever since. What used to take 5 full-time people to maintain, now takes one person 20 hours per week, and CU has gone on to become a recognized leader in Drupal among educational groups.

New Balance Sports Research Lab Site Improves Digital Footprint [Oct. 7, 2013]

Submitted on
lundi, le 7 octobre 2013h
,
Retail Touchpoints

The explosion of digital in the fitness community has made tracking daily activity and performance easier than ever. Mobile apps, content-rich web sites and user-friendly products enable the consumer to stay connected with their goals while personalizing the experience at the same time.

The same can be said about what consumers choose to wear and lace up. How can you perform at your best if your footwear in particular isn’t delivering the comfort, feel and look you want?

The New Balance web site, Sports Research Lab, takes this idea and runs with it.

Combining A Digital And Interactive Experience

The web site serves as a test program, which engages consumers with New Balance designers, manufacturers and product managers to provide feedback on prototype footwear.

When a consumer comes to the Sports Research Lab site and applies to be part of the test group, a prototype is sent to them for initial impressions: how the shoe feels, looks and performs. Those results are then received by the design, manufacturing and production team, which they then use to make alterations to fit those needs. This process consists of several stages between both groups to enhance future prototypes until it is ready for production.

Explaining Varnish for Beginners

A short time ago I published a presentation I gave at DrupalACT entitled 'Varnish for Beginners'. Whilst the presentation itself went down well and those attending hopefully garnered a good amount of knowledge, I thought I'd share the basics in this blog post for those who would like to know more about it.

What is Varnish?

Personalizing the Digital Experience Using Simple Taxonomy

(Part 2 of the Exploring Personalization Blog Series)

There aren’t a shortage of tools and techniques surrounding successful personalization as I discussed in my last blog post. But with that being said, executing through precise, innovative taxonomy needs to be done effectively in order to turn viewers into returning visitors.

Responsive Design in Higher Education: How Do We Do It Better?

At our higher education Meetup last week in Atlanta (http://higheredmeetupatlanta.drupalgardens.com/#), Savannah College of Art and Design (our host school) presented their new Drupal web site and talked about how it’s impacting their overall business. The assembled group was impressed with what they saw.

The Wisdom of Crowds and The Open Source Way

What do high-speed rail, ash tree dieback, and changing world demographics have in common?

These are just three projects that are actively harnessing what James Surowiecki refers to as, The Wisdom of Crowds.

Open Source Design

Low-cost Drupal website brings high-end rewards for Kansas City non-profit

The journey from a dimly lit photo of a young woman with a blank stare to the smiling young man at the top of the homepage is a metaphor for the hope that Higher M-Pact brings to troubled teens, but also mirrors the journey of Higher M-Pact’s online presence.

What does the White House's Executive Order mean for Open Government?

(Part 1 of the "Open Gov" blog series)

The White House's Executive Order of May 9, will cause a shift in the way that Federal agencies present data. The Executive Order, “Making Open and Machine Readable the New Default for Government Information,” mandates that, “the default state of new and modernized Government information resources shall be open and machine readable.”

Why Steve Jobs Would Have Loved Drupal

I’m an unashamed Apple fanboy. I’ll resist the temptation to #humblebrag about all the Apple gear I’ve owned through the years. I worship at the altar of the late Steve Jobs, who while flawed, has inspired me through his relentless passion and creativity.

News of the paperback release of his autobiography in September reminded me of one of my favorite moments from his book:

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