Accueil / Taxonomy term

Drupal

Indéfini
Anki Taps Acquia as DRIVE Launch Draws Apple-Sized Audience
The Challenge

As the launch of their product approached, Anki knew they had two major challenges. The first was a website that would withstand the huge influx of curious visitors arriving as a result of the Apple spotlight. As importantly, Anki realized that if the website couldn’t convey the great experience of racing the intelligent robotic cars, people would not opt to try or purchase Anki DRIVE.

Los Angeles Undertakes Massive Website Relaunch with Drupal [August 21, 2014]

Submitted on
jeudi, le 21 août 2014h
,
Government Technology

By Jason Shueh

On Thursday, Aug. 21, the city of Los Angeles announced plans to replace its city-run websites with a set of open sourced alternatives.

Ted Ross, the city’s assistant general manager for technology solutions, confirmed the deal brokered between Acquia, the tech firm known for its Drupal content management system, and the Los Angeles Information Technology Agency (ITA), which is coordinating the project. The announcement follows nearly a year of research and talks with Acquia and ends the city's partnership with Oracle and its legacy CMS “Stellent.”

There are more than 20 websites to relaunch through the Drupal overhaul, with the most visited sites — the city’s home page, public television channel, and its transportation department — slated for first releases. The city sites join the Los Angeles Public Library, the LA Philharmonic and the Visit Los Angeles tourism site, all of which are already on Drupal.

No specific dates were given for estimated relaunches, and in email, Ross said the city did not wish to say more about the development until the first sites were closer to completion.

However, Todd Akers, Acquia's vice president of public sector development, said the collaboration was a huge win for company that now has the state of New York, the city of San Francisco and a variety of federal agencies on the open sourced Drupal platform.

Every Second Counts: Getting Started with Personalization

Think you know your site visitors? Think again. The majority of site traffic is anonymous, which makes it the job of the digital marketer to get to know visitors on a more personal level. What complicates this is that more often than not, 70% of the decision-making process is complete before a lead even reaches out to sales.

Indéfini

Cloud, Open Source Power TransLink's Web Presence [July 16, 2014]

Submitted on
mercredi, le 16 juillet 2014h
,
Computerworld

By Rohan Pearce
Queensland public transport agency finds value in Drupal community
It was an aging bespoke application that drove TransLink to seek a new content management system, but it was the strength of the community surrounding the open source project that helped the Queensland public transport agency choose Drupal.

Prior to the switch to Drupal, which began last year, the former TransLink site was partly based on static files and partly on a "home-grown CMS that managed a lot of our custom content such as service disruption and events, so that we could do a little bit of distributed authoring within the organisation," said Natalie Gorring, manager, online products and services, at TransLink.

The old CMS, based on the Yii Web framework "was a few years old and needed updates," Gorring said. "As the TransLink website was evolving, we weren't able to keep up with updating the CMS that we had." As a result, TransLink started looking for alternatives.

"We didn't want to keep putting Band-Aids on our old CMS," Gorring explained.

The organisation reviewed a number of open source and proprietary CMSes, and Drupal came out on top. The open source project's active community was a factor in the decision, Gorring said. In addition, the TransLink team had in-house PHP skills, and that was also a factor in choosing the new CMS.

For the transition, TransLink relied heavily on its in-house skills but partnered with Acquia, the Boston-based company founded by Drupal creator Dries Buytaert, for hosting. The TransLink site is hosted in Acquia's cloud service, Gorring said.

"The [Queensland] government at the moment is very supportive of cloud and data sharing," Gorring said.

(An IT strategy update released by the Queensland government in May this year placed cloud computing "at the centre of government ICT reform" in the state.)

Going with a cloud service "took some pressure off our business systems team, and we have a contract with Acquia for 24-hour support," Gorring said. The TransLink site gets around 130,000 unique visits daily.

The initial scope of the Drupal project was a 'like for like' transition, replicating the organisation's existing website using the open source CMS. "We didn't have the time to add new features at the time," Gorring said. "For customers there was no difference, except maybe a few URL changes."

The transition took place over a period of around nine months, beginning late last year.

READ MORE:

Setting Government Data Free [July 3, 2014]

Submitted on
mercredi, le 3 septembre 2014h
,
Semantic Web

By Jennifer Zaino

As July 4 approaches, the subject of open government data can’t help but be on many U.S. citizens’ minds. That includes the citizens who are responsible for opening up that data to their fellow Americans. They might want to take a look at NuCivic Data Enterprise, the recently unveiled cloud-based, open source, open data platform for government from NuCivic, in partnership with Acquia and Carahsoft. It’s providing agencies an OpenSaaS approach to meeting open data mandates to publish and share datasets online, based on the Drupal open source content management system.

NuCivic’s open source DKAN Drupal distribution provides the core data management components for the NuCivic Data platform; it was recognized last week as a grand prize winner for Amazon Web Services’ Global City on a Cloud Innovation Challenge in the Partner in Innovation category. Projects in this category had to demonstrate that the application solves a particular challenge faced by local government entities. As part of the award, the NuCivic team gets $25,000 in AWS services to further support its open data efforts.

DKAN, the company says, meets U.S. Project Open Data requirements, and includes both the DKAN Dataset and DKAN Datastore, so that open data publishers can easily manage their open data publication process while complying with industry- and government-mandated standards. DKAN includes among its features the ability to: explore, search, add, describe, tag, and group datasets via a web front-end or API; customize metadata fields, themes and branding; use metdata and data APIs, data previews, and visualizations through the Recline.js data visualization tool; and manage access control, version history with rollback, INSPIRE/RDF support, and user analytics.

Though it’s customizable, out of the box it uses the DCAT RDF vocabulary for metadata that is designed to facilitate interoperability between data catalogs published on the Web.

NuCivic’s founders have roots in the government sector. Co-founder and CEO Andrew Hoppin was a public sector CIO in New York, involved in overhauling the state Senate’s IT systems. In a blog he posted when the product launched, he wrote that, “Our strategy is to productize the Drupal content management system to address a full range of government enterprise information software needs, starting with open data…. We think Drupal is a fantastic framework upon which to base civic solutions for many types of functional needs, because of the global scale of the civic-interested engineering community behind it...

READ MORE

Direct from the White House: APIs are Key to Extending Platforms [May 20, 2014]

Submitted on
mardi, le 20 mai 2014h
,
OpenSource.com

By Jason Hibbets

To a technology director at the White House, the State of the Union is like the Superbowl. While the world is watching the President of the United States deliver an address to the nation, Leigh Heyman and his team are managing the media technology behind the scenes to create an enhanced and interactive experience for the viewers. How many of you watched the State of the Union on YouTube this year?

As the Director of New Media Technologies at the Executive Office of the President, Heyman uses strong leadership to chart new technical territory for the White House. If you ever get to meet him in person, the first thing that will likely grab your attention is the presidential lapel pin on his suit. It's a little intimidating, but his broad smile and confident handshake tell the whole story.

It's one of confidence and openness, and it's what struck me when I met Heyman for the first time at the Palmetto Open Source Conference in Columbia, South Carolina. He was presenting a talk about We The People, the White House online petition platform. It is one of many tech projects with a nod towards a more open and transparent government that Heyman and his team have led, including WhiteHouse.gov which runs on Drupal and various White House hackathons held at the White House itself.

Though no less extraordinary, it's somewhat old news that the White House has been using open source technologies in it's efforts. At DrupalCon San Francisco, the White House revealed their first contributions to Drupal. What's exciting now is they are consistently giving back to open source projects and writing web APIs.

This marks a new era for the government's relationship with open source, and is due in part to the work the New Media Technologies team does to promote a more transparent, collaborative, and participatory government.

In this interview, Leigh Heyman gives me some of the backstory on how he came to work for the Executive Office of the President and some fun facts about the famous Death Star Petition. He also discusses recent new media projects at the White House, shedding light on how they might live beyond the current administration and forge a new relationship with US citizens.

Read more:

Australian Government Likely to Standardise on Drupal [May 9, 2014]

Submitted on
vendredi, le 9 mai 2014h
,
Computerworld

By Rohan Pearce

AGIMO wants Drupal delivered from the cloud to be the standard CMS

The federal government is eyeing the introduction of a government-wide content-management system. The Australian Government Information Management Office (AGIMO) has indicated its preference is to use the open-source Drupal Web platform and to have the CMS delivered as a cloud service.

"The Government Content Management System (GovCMS) is envisaged as an important service offering for Australian Commonwealth Government agencies," the Australian government CTO, John Sheridan, wrote in a blog entry.

"GovCMS is intended to support more effective web channel delivery functions within Government, and enable agencies to redirect effort from non-core transactional activities, towards higher-value activities that are more aligned with core agency missions," a draft statement of requirements issued by AGIMO states.

An analysis by AGIMO found that between 182 and 450 websites could be transitioned to GovCMS over four years. The use of an open source solution means that Drupal modules could be shared between public sector agencies and the community, the draft states.

A transition to GovCMS will begin with Australia.gov.au and Finance.gov.au, the document states. The target go-live date is September this year.

Read more:

Open Source Pitfalls - and How to Avoid Them [April 21, 2014]

Submitted on
lundi, le 21 avril 2014h
,
Network World

By Maria Korolov, Network World

It's hard to imagine a company these days that isn't using open source software somewhere, whether it's Linux running a company's print and web servers, the Firefox browser on user desktops, or the Android operating system on mobile devices. In, fact, there are now more than a million different open source projects, according to Black Duck Software, a maker of open source management tools and owner of the Ohloh open source software directory. And open source continues to grow. According to an SAP research report, the number of open source projects roughly doubles every 14 months. But not all open source projects are created equal. According to Ohloh, for the 100,375 projects for which activity information is available, around 80 percent were listed as having low activity, very low activity or were completely inactive...

The success or failure of any particular open source project depends strongly on the community surrounding it – the developers who contribute code, the testers, the documentation writers, the people who answer questions in support forums, and the end users. There are a number of ways to gauge the size and activity level of an open source project's community. Ohloh offers one tool. Another approach is to go to the project's home page or the site where it's hosted and check out the history of code commits and the activity on the discussion boards.

Read more at:

Maintaining your installed Drupal distro

Pages