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Growing A Mo: Lessons Learned From The Movember Project [Dec 19, 2013]

Submitted on
jeudi, le 19 decembre 2013h
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MediaPost

By Bryan House

Were any of your colleagues or friends sporting awkward moustaches until recently? If so, it’s likely they were among the thousands of Mo-Bros taking part in the worldwide Movember movement committed to raising funds and awareness for men’s health, specifically prostate cancer and other cancers that affect men. Those awkward moustaches were unavoidable at my office. My company has been an active and proud participant for the past four years; last month more than 80 participants and hundreds of contributors helped raise $38,000 as part of Acquia’s "Mo Drupal" team this year.

The success of Movember is no fluke. From its founding a decade ago in Melbourne, the Movember moustache has expanded to more than two dozen countries. In fact, it’s the simple act of growing a moustache that has encouraged several hundred thousand men around the world to become walking billboards for the — quite literal — face of men’s health, an extremely successful strategy that has helped the annual fundraiser gain momentum. These “Mo Bros” (and their ever-supportive and patient Mo Sistas) raise awareness by prompting private and public conversations about men’s health. They also raise an amazing amount of funds for programs that support men’s health initiatives; Movember donations this year surpassed $106 million worldwide.

According to Mark Hedstrom, the U.S. director for the effort, “Movember is about getting men to engage in a fun and somewhat irreverent campaign. By supporting a fun environment, men start engaging more in their personal health.”

So how has the Movember Foundation had so much success engaging such a vast group of men? Let’s take a look at the top three things: language, competition and keeping it fun.

Acquia Won't Rush IPO [Dec. 19, 2013]

Submitted on
lundi, le 30 decembre 2013h
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Computerworld

By Rohan Pearce

Boston-based Web technology company Acquia is heading towards an IPO but it's in no rush to go public according to Dries Buytaert, Acquia's co-founder and the creator of the open source CMS Drupal.

"For us [an IPO] is something that we're working on but it's not front and centre right now," Buytaert, the CTO of the Drupal services firm, said.

"We think it's a key milestone, but it's only just that as well: It's a milestone in a much longer path to building a significant independent company. So that's the reason I say we're not obsessed with it."

Earlier this year, the company hired Dennis Morgan as CFO, which is "obviously a key component for being able to do an IPO," the CTO added.

"In general we want to be an IPO-ready company such that we have the luxury to file for an IPO if we were to choose to," Buytaert said.

Inside the Road to Acquia's Possible IPO [Dec. 11, 2013]

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mercredi, le 11 decembre 2013h
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CMSWire

By Scott Raynovich

The open-source model for software is shaking up the Web Content Management System (CMS) business. One company that has greatly benefited from this is Acquia, one of the Boston area's most successful startups. Co-founded by Drupal's creator in 2007, Acquia has doubled its revenues in each of the last two years and sparked chatter of a US initial public offering (IPO) in 2014.

The Burlington, Mass.-based startup's savvy move to pick Drupal, the open-source CMS development platform, takes a page out of the Red Hat Software book. That model leverages the speed and flexibility of an open-source community while providing the service and support infrastructure to reassure enterprise customers who want to make sure the software is mission-critical.

While in Boston last week, several sources in the startup and venture capital (VC) community identified Acquia as one of the leading IPO candidate for 2014. On the record, nobody affiliated with Acquia will confirm an IPO is in the works. Despite the chatter, VCs never want to talk about an IPO, but that's usually on an agenda — cash and liquidity for investors and insiders is always welcome when you can get it

Michael Skok, an Acquia investor and board member and a partner with North Bridge Venture Partners, wouldn't confirm any imminent IPO plans. But he did confirm the company's solid business model is linked hand-in-hand with Drupal's growth.

"We, as investors, Tom Erickson (the CEO of Acquia), and the team at Acquia are all committed to building an enduring business for the long-term," Skok wrote in an email in response to questions. "They continue to build a strong foundation for future growth fueled by massive digital disruption as organizations of all sizes scramble to keep up with the speed of the web."

Step Aside Coding, It's Time to Embrace the Assembled Web [Dec. 9, 2013]

Submitted on
lundi, le 9 decembre 2013h
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Forbes

By Dries Buytaert

To "assemble" means to build. Assembling also means that we come together. Sometimes, both aspects are true. When that happens and we work together to build, we are better off for it.

The open source community is a perfect example of this. When Linux creator Linus Torvalds spoke about how it felt to get contributions from a worldwide network of people, he remarked "I had hoisted myself up on the shoulders of giants". I'm lucky enough to feel the same way.

The Internet has created a culture of sharing, letting people connect and collaborate on areas of common interest. When I started developing Drupal in 2000 from my university dormitory in Antwerp, I never imagined I'd build a network of people who were interested in building a content management system with me. Yet word of my project spread, and before I knew it, I was getting contributions to my project from around the world. Soon I also was standing on the shoulders of giants.

5 Experiences Commerce Websites Should Replicate from the Apple Store [Dec. 6, 2013]

Submitted on
lundi, le 30 decembre 2013h
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The Next Web

By Tom Wentworth, Acquia CMO

Whether you’re an Android or iOS user, we’ve all probably made our way into an Apple store at some point. After pushing past the suspiciously friendly blue-shirted door greeters, the in-store experience is actually quite pleasant. It’s a far cry from what you’d expect from a massive consumer goods retailer; people actually seem to be enjoying themselves in the stores and are eager to come back.

Unlike big-box retailers who couldn’t care less about which products you buy (as long as you buy something), Apple controls its brand message and experience within its stores. The result is a unique brand engagement that’s a win for both the Apple name and the consumer. This is exactly the experience Apple intends.

Apple has largely been successful in creating an in-store shopping experience that’s as simple, dynamic, and stress-free as a visit to its online store. While brick-and-mortar retailers are seemingly shutting their doors left and right, Apple stores seem to keep popping up around the world.

That got us thinking: what tactics did Apple implement in some of its physical stores that every retailer and brand can adopt? Here’s a list of five

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Breaking Bad Habits in IT: Avoid the Suite Trap [Dec. 2, 2013]

Submitted on
lundi, le 2 decembre 2013h
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CMSWire

By Tom Wentworth

It’s time to break some bad habits. Fifteen years ago, CIOs bought into expensive technology suites that offered a “one stop shop” for every digital project on their agenda. These suites consolidated a range of applications into one package, offered by a large vendor like Oracle, SAP or IBM. But these “one stop shops” proved to be a bad investment. Individual applications rolled into suites became old news, and CIOs found themselves locked into their investments while companies like Salesforce.com and Workday took a majority of the market share away from applications in suites.

And now history is repeating itself …

CIO budgets are shifting toward the CMO, encouraging large marketing technology providers to recreate the types of suites big tech companies introduced years ago, targeted specifically to CMOs. These large packages pieced together from individual applications that guide every process of planning, creating and implementing marketing campaigns do not offer the dynamic solution marketers need in today’s digital age.

America's Fastest Growing Enterprise Software Companies of 2013 [Nov. 30, 2013]

Submitted on
Samedi, le 30 novembre 2013h
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Forbes

By Louis Columbus

Earlier this month Deloitte published the 2013 Technology Fast 500™, their annual ranking of the fastest growing life sciences, media, software, technology, telecommunications and clean technology companies in North America. The winners are selected based on the percentage fiscal year revenue growth from 2008 to 2012, and for the eighteenth consecutive year, software is leading all industries.

To review the 2013 Technology Fast 500™ eligibility requirements and methodology please see this document. You can find a copy of the Winner’s Brochure here and the complete list here. The following infographic also summary of the key findings of the 2013 Technology Fast 500 Rankings.

Reason To Be Thankful: Being Named A Fast-Growing Tech Company [Nov. 27, 2013]

Submitted on
mercredi, le 27 novembre 2013h
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SemanticWeb.com

By Jennifer Zaino

It’s got to be a happy Thanksgiving for a number of tech companies that made their way to Deloitte’s recently-released Technology Fast 500. The 2013 ranking of the fastest-growing tech companies based in North America also has something to show for anyone who’s doubted that there’s money to be made taking advantage of semantic and other Web 3.0 concepts, a look at the list should show it’s time for the doubting to stop.

Have a look at some of the winners with their overall rankings:

#2 Acquia. Drupal claims the title of being the first mainstream content management system to support semantic web technology in its core. The Drupal-powered project Acquia was co-founded by Drupal creator Dries Buytaert to provide cloud, SaaS, and other services to organizations building websites on Drupal – and has on staff software engineer Stéphane Corlosquet, who had a big hand in bringing those semantic capabilities to Drupal’s core. In fact, Corlosquet spoke at the most recent SemTechBiz about Acquia as an example of a Drupal-powered project managing its content as Linked Data.

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How A Dorm Room Project Became Acquia, the Web's Go-To Content Management System [Nov. 25, 2013]

Submitted on
lundi, le 25 novembre 2013h
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Inc. Magazine

By Doug Cantor

As a grad student in computer science at the University of Antwerp in the early 2000s, Dries Buytaert began fiddling with what he thought was a fun side project: an open-source software platform that could support all kinds of websites. He called the system Drupal--Dutch for "droplet"--and figured no more than a dozen people ever would use it.

Buytaert graduated in 2007. But unlike his fellow grads, he didn’t have to look for a job. It turned out that his modest side project had captured enough users and buzz to be the basis of a business.

So Buytaert partnered with Jay Batson, a Boston tech entrepreneur he'd met at a conference, and founded founded Acquia, which provides service and support for websites built on the Drupal content-management system. They set up shop in Burlington, Massachusetts, the better to tap into Boston's deep well of tech talent. Tom Erickson, a former executive at the digital mapping company Tele-Atlas, joined the business as a board member in the first year and now serves as CEO, while Buytaert keeps his focus squarely on the technology.

Five years later, Acquia has clients in 25 countries, and has built websites for clients including Twitter and Intel. It’s appeared on the Inc. 500 list two years in a row, landing at No. 109 in 2013; 2012 revenue hit $45.4 million.) It now has more than 400 employees, offices in Germany, Sweden, Belgium, and Singapore, and investors like Goldman Sachs, Accolade Partners, and Investor Growth Capital.

A more astonishing fact: Drupal now provides the backbone for more than 2 percent of all of the sites on the Internet. For that reason alone, Inc. considered the founders of Acquia are strong candidates for 2013's entrepreneur of the year.

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5 Reasons for the Boston Tech/Innovation Community To Be Thankful This Week [Nov. 25, 2013]

Submitted on
lundi, le 25 novembre 2013h
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VentureFizz

By Dennis Keohane

There is so much to be thankful for as Thanksgiving approaches this Thursday, especially as the robust tech ecosystem in Boston continues to trend upwards. Here is our list of a few specific things to appreciate as part of Boston's startup/innovation community this week.

Things are Going Great in Boston

The Startup Community should be really excited about what is going on these days in town. Not only because there seems to be more and more (sometimes surprising) funding announcements; not only because some "pillar" companies are stepping into the "public" consciousness and leading the next wave of Boston companies by sharing their experience and re-investing their dollars; not only because some of Boston's mobile app and e-commerce companies are expanding rapidly; but, because there is an almost palpable spirit of cooperation, widespread mentorship, and "all-in", familial mentality that is coursing through the city like never before.

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