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Acquia

When Digital Marketing Meets Open Source [May 27, 2014]

Submitted on
mardi, le 27 mai 2014h
,
Computerworld

By Rohan Pearce

The chief marketing officer of Massachusetts-based Acquia wants to take the open source message to other marketers

It's a product that actually costs nothing, is up against entrenched competitors, and exists in a category that enterprises have in the past been wary of. All in all, marketing open source to marketers was probably never going to be an easy job.

So you might forgive Tom Wentworth if he was a little wary of taking up the role of chief marketing officer at Acquia. But the CMO says that when he received a message from a recruiter asking if he was interested in the position, he jumped at the chance. "I couldn't have dialled back the number faster when I saw him asking about Acquia," Wentworth says.

Wentworth took up the role at Boston-based Acquia about 17 months ago. The company provides software and services based on Drupal: The open source content management system which the federal government has indicated it is likely to standardise on for a whole-of-government CMS.

Although it is Wentworth's first experience at an open source company, he has held marketing roles in other content management software vendors.

Before Acquia, he was CMO at Ektron, and prior to that he was Web solutions evangelist at Interwoven, which was acquired in 2009 by Autonomy — which itself was snapped up by HP in 2011 (a somewhat fraught acquisition.)

"I've been in the content management space for about 15 years now," Wentworth says. He joined Acquia in December 2012.

The decision to join Acquia was a "if you can't beat them, join them", Wentworth says. "As somebody's who's been in the market for so long, I saw the clear shift to open source and I saw the disruption that Drupal was having in the market and really wanted to be a part of it.

"I think when I look at the future of integrated digital experiences and how I see CMOs changing how they adapt digital technology I think Drupal is so strongly suited for that that I had to find a way to get here."

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Acquia Scores $50M in Series F Funding [May 27, 2014]

Submitted on
mardi, le 27 mai 2014h
,
GigaOM

By Barb Darrow

Acquia, the company building a commercial business around the open-source Drupal content management technology, now has $50 million in new funding, bringing total investment to a tidy $118.6 million.

The cash influx will be used to build out sales and marketing — including adding more channel partners – and to push the use of the product in personalized marketing commerce applications, according to a statement.

The round, disclosed in a blog post by Acquia CTO and co-founder Dries Buytaert, was led by new backer New Enterprise Associates, with participation from Split Rock Partners. Existing investors North Bridge Venture Partners, Sigma Partners, Investor Growth Capital, Tenaya Capital, and Accolade Partners also participated.

The Burlington, Mass. company looks to be on the road to an IPO and just brought Bill Sorenson on board as CFO, according to BostInno. Sorenson helped shepherd Qlik Technologies and Blade Logic through IPOs of their own.

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Website Software Seller Acquia Adds $50M, Led by NEA [May 27, 2014]

Submitted on
mardi, le 27 mai 2014h
,
Xconomy

By Curt Woodward

Acquia hasn’t been shy over the past few years about its hopes to become a public company. Today, the seller of website management software is stacking up some more venture capital: a $50 million investment that Acquia says will help it continue growing in multiple areas.

The new investment was led by New Enterprise Associates, which will add growth equity leader Ravi Viswanathan to the company’s board. Another new investor, Split Rock Partners, also contributed to the round, along with some previous venture investors.

Acquia, founded in 2007, has been billing itself as “pre-IPO” for some time now. CEO Tom Erickson told the Boston Business Journal in March that his company could go public as early as this year, and Acquia added a new chief financial officer last week, a move that was touted in context with an eventual IPO filing.

In an interview Tuesday, chief marketing officer Tom Wentworth said the new financing hadn’t changed the company’s plans for a possible IPO. ”This funding is really about allowing us to move faster and accelerate our momentum,” Wentworth said. “Being a public company is certainly an option for us, but right now we’re focusing on continuing our really fast growth.”

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Transit Strike Shows Power of Drupal, Cloud Computing [May 16, 2014]

Submitted on
vendredi, le 16 mai 2014h
,
StateScoop

In October, Bay Area Rapid Transit, which provides public transportation to the city of San Francisco, found itself in a public labor dispute, which culminated in a four-day strike that halted transportation services.

With nearly 400,000 daily riders — San Franciscans who relied on the system for transportation — the department’s website found itself with 10 times its normal traffic as users looked for information on when trains would run again.

The increase in Web traffic normally would have shut the site down, but just weeks before, the transit system — affectionately known as BART — moved its Web operations to Drupal, hosted inside Acquia’s cloud.

“Drupal allowed them the space to innovate and find better ways to communicate with their users,” Todd Akers, vice president of public sector for Acquia, told StateScoop. “In addition, hosting on Acquia Cloud allowed them to reduce costs by 70 percent and gave them the elasticity needed to handle times of higher demand.”

Akers pointed to a similar situation Acquia worked on with the New York Metropolitan Transit Authority in October 2012. When Hurricane Sandy caused outages throughout the northeast, the department’s Web operations were able to keep running – keeping citizens informed – during times of crisis when communication is needed most.

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Winning in the New and Improved Sales and Marketing Funnel [May 12, 2014]

Submitted on
lundi, le 12 mai 2014h
,

By Cynthia Clark

The sales and marketing funnel has morphed considerably from a decade ago. In adapting to the new buying journey, marketers must deliver the right touches, in the right places, at the right time to move prospects to action.
- - - - -

The buying journey has changed. Control has shifted from organizations to customers, which means today's customers are taking it upon themselves to learn as much as they can about a brand and its competitors before making a purchase.

According to Forrester Research, today's buyers would have gone through up to 90 percent of their buying journey before they make the first contact with a vendor. In some product categories, buyers will only contact a sales person when they're ready for a price quote. "The sales funnel is no longer linear and the customer is completely in control of the path to purchase," explains Mark Osborn, SAP's global lead for consumer products industry marketing.

With this trend prevalent in both B2B and B2C interactions, sales and marketing teams need to adapt to this reality and make changes to their funnel in order to remain competitive. As Claire Rodes, revenue marketing coach at the Pedowitz Group, notes, while in the past, sales teams were involved in the majority of the purchasing journey and marketing had a small part, their roles have now been reversed. Tim Riesterer, chief strategy and marketing officer at Corporate Visions, believes that organizations need to undergo a "fundamental mind shift" that revolves around having conversations with customers rather than deploying campaigns.

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Dries Buytaert is ICT Personality of the Year 2014 [9 mei 2014]

Submitted on
vendredi, le 9 mai 2014h
,
AutomatiseringGids

Dries Buytaert is door DataNews verkozen tot ICT Personality van het jaar 2014. De prijs werd uitgereikt tijdens het Data News Awards gala dat dit jaar voor de 15e keer werd georganiseerd.

Buytaert is de uitvinder van Drupal, het bekende een opensource-contentmanagementsysteem (CMS). Aanvankelijk had hij slechts een bulletin-board systeem voor ogen, maar gaandeweg is de software uitgegroeid tot een compleet contentmanagementframework (CMF).

Eigen bedrijf
Op basis van Drupal is een eigen bedrijf opgericht onder de naam Acquia. Dit heeft al enkele keren het predikaat 'snelstgroeiende softwarebedrijf in de VS' gekregen. Buytaert wordt ook wel de bekendste Belg in de Verenigde Staten genoemd.

Warum Ein Modernes CMS Wichtig Ist [9 Mai 2014]

Submitted on
vendredi, le 9 mai 2014h
,
TecChannel

By Jeffrey A McGuire

Moderne Content Managementsysteme sind der Motor interessanter und dynamischer Websites. Sie entkoppeln Programmierung und Inhaltserstellung, bereiten Daten dynamisch auf und passen Online-Auftritte automatisch an die Endgeräte der Nutzer an.

In den letzten zehn Jahren hat der Bereich "Content im Internet" eine Entwicklung durchgemacht, die so schnell wohl in keiner anderen Industrie möglich ist. Aus einfachen Websites in simplem HTML wurden Medien-Plattformen mit Texten, Bildern, Audio und Videos, deren Inhalte nahtlos verknüpft sind und auf den unterschiedlichsten Endgeräten konsumiert werden. Entsprechend sind Websites heute eine fundamentale Komponente der Geschäftstätigkeit eines Unternehmens. Der Online-Auftritt ist Visitenkarte, virtuelles Schaufenster und oft Verkaufsportal der jeweiligen Firma. Selbst wer keinen direkten Geschäften im Web nachgeht, kann es sich kaum leisten, eine veraltete oder fehlerhafte Website zu betreiben.
Schluss mit statischen Websites

Websites sind keine Einbahnstraße mehr. Die Kommunikation läuft dynamisch zwischen Nutzer und Anbieter ab. Firmen betreiben Blogs, integrieren Bilderstrecken, Podcasts oder Videos während Kunden und Nutzer kommentieren, Artikel in sozialen Netzwerken verlinken und mit den Mitarbeitern diskutieren.

Jeffrey McGuire: „Open Source und Business passen perfekt zusammen“ [8 Mai 2014]

Submitted on
jeudi, 8. mai 2014 Uhr
,
T3N

Open Source und wirtschaftliche Interessen: Schließt nicht das eine das andere aus? Nein, sagt Jeffrey McGuire, Open Source Evangelist bei Acquia. Warum Unternehmertum und Open Source eine perfekte Kombination sind, hat er auf der re:publica erklärt.

Jeffrey McGuire: Open Source führt zu wirtschaftlichem Erfolg

Unternehmen müssen wirtschaftlich denken, schließlich müssen wir am Ende des Tages alle unsere Mieten bezahlen. Das ist auch Jeffrey „Jam“ McGuire völlig klar. Der in Köln lebende US-Amerikaner arbeitet als Open-Source-Evangelist für Acquia , ein Software-Unternehmen, das sich auf das Content-Management-Framework Drupal spezialisiert hat. Für McGuire steht die bei Open-Source-Projekten selbstverständliche kostenlose Bereitstellung der eigenen Arbeitsergebnisse dem Ziel der Profitabilität nicht entgegen.

Im Gegenteil: In McGuires Augen sorgt Open-Source-Software für mehr Sicherheit und Flexibilität im Umgang mit den eigenen IT-Lösungen. Hinzu kommt ein zeitlicher Vorteil, denn wer auf eine große Entwickler-Community und ihre Ergebnisse zugreifen kann, reagiert im Falle von Problemen oder notwendigen Anpassungen im Zweifel schneller als die Konkurrenz.

CMO Interview: Marketing Open Source (to Marketers) [April 24, 2014]

Submitted on
jeudi, le 24 avril 2014h
,
CMO

By Rohan Pearce

The CMO of Massachusetts-based Acquia wants to take the open source software message to other marketers

It's a product that costs nothing, is up against entrenched competitors, and exists in a category that enterprises have in the past been wary of. All in all, marketing open source software to other marketers was never going to be an easy job.

So you might forgive Tom Wentworth if he was a little wary of taking up the role of chief marketing officer at Acquia. But the CMO says that when he received a message from a recruiter asking if he was interested in the position, he jumped at the chance. "I couldn't have dialled back the number faster when I saw him asking about Acquia," Wentworth says.

Wentworth took up the role at Boston-based Acquia 17 months ago. The company provides software and services based on Drupal: A well-established, modular open source content management system.

Although it is Wentworth's first experience at an open source company, he has held marketing roles in other content management software vendors for about 15 years. Before Acquia, he was CMO at Ektron, and prior to that he was Web solutions evangelist at Interwoven, which was acquired in 2009 by Autonomy — which itself was snapped up by HP in 2011 (a somewhat fraught acquisition ).

Wentworth joined Acquia in December 2012. The decision was a "if you can't beat them, join them", he says. "As somebody's who's been in the market for so long, I saw the clear shift to open source and I saw the disruption Drupal was having in the market and really wanted to be a part of it.

"When I look at the future of integrated digital experiences and how I see CMOs are changing how they adapt digital technology, I think Drupal is so strongly suited for that and I had to find a way to get here."

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Open Source Pitfalls - and How to Avoid Them [April 21, 2014]

Submitted on
lundi, le 21 avril 2014h
,
Network World

By Maria Korolov, Network World

It's hard to imagine a company these days that isn't using open source software somewhere, whether it's Linux running a company's print and web servers, the Firefox browser on user desktops, or the Android operating system on mobile devices. In, fact, there are now more than a million different open source projects, according to Black Duck Software, a maker of open source management tools and owner of the Ohloh open source software directory. And open source continues to grow. According to an SAP research report, the number of open source projects roughly doubles every 14 months. But not all open source projects are created equal. According to Ohloh, for the 100,375 projects for which activity information is available, around 80 percent were listed as having low activity, very low activity or were completely inactive...

The success or failure of any particular open source project depends strongly on the community surrounding it – the developers who contribute code, the testers, the documentation writers, the people who answer questions in support forums, and the end users. There are a number of ways to gauge the size and activity level of an open source project's community. Ohloh offers one tool. Another approach is to go to the project's home page or the site where it's hosted and check out the history of code commits and the activity on the discussion boards.

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