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Acquia

How Acquia Brought Drupal to the Enterprise [Sept. 18, 2014]

Submitted on
jeudi, le 18 septembre 2014h
,
TechRepublic

Dries Buytaert built what would become the open source software Drupal in his dorm room at the University of Antwerp in Belgium. What started as an experiment to build an intranet message board for his friends eventually turned into the open source software behind Drupal, and launched in 2001.

Drupal quickly grew, now boasts more than one million participants in its open source community online. In addition to a spike in individual users, Buytaert began to see an uptick in Drupal adoption by big businesses and large nonprofit organizations.

While working on his research dissertation, Buytaert began providing support to companies that had adopted the Drupal software. He recalled one particular evening when, after he was approached by a company in the UK for help, he spent the entire night working to resolve the issues it was having.

"That was my ah-ha moment," Buytaert said. "I realized there was a big opportunity to help organizations accelerate their adoption of Drupal and be successful."

Buytaert founded Acquia with Jay Batson in 2007 after the pair were introduced by Michael Skok, a partner at North Bridge Venture Networks. Acquia provides enterprise products, services, and support for Drupal, with the goal of accelerating Drupal adoption among enterprise users. Currently, Acquia works with brands such as Pinterest, Mercedes Benz, Warner Music Group, and Stanford University.

Along with businesses and nonprofits, governmental sites now run on Drupal too. The official White House site has a Drupal initiative, and Acquia published a case study on data.gov.uk, an open data project started by the UK government.

While some enterprises are hesitant to embrace open source, Buytaert believes that the collaborative software development it provides is what has kept Acquia innovative. His hope is that Acquia can be a role model for entrepreneurs with similar aspirations.

The product set
Acquia's product set aims help enterprises successfully use Drupal. The company's offerings begin with Acquia Cloud, the company's platform-as-a-service that provides cloud solutions and development tools. Buytaert said that it includes pre-built testing solutions, an API for creating custom tests, and a tool called Acquia Insight.

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Dont Skip the Proof of Concept [Sept. 17, 2014]

Submitted on
mercredi, le 17 septembre 2014h
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CMSWire

By Tom Wentworth

Generally speaking, the larger the purchase, the more time and research we put into the decision before shelling out our hard-earned bucks. You don’t buy a car without test driving it, or a new couch without sitting on it. You probably don’t even buy shoes without walking around in them first.
Unfortunately, sometimes major technology purchases go unvetted and buyer’s remorse sets in hard, evident in the state of Oregon’s recent lawsuit against Oracle for the failed deployment of its Cover Oregon healthcare exchange website.

This case reflects a dated IT evaluation process that’s all too common: businesses buying software based on RFPs and product demos, while failing to make vendors go through a proof-of-concept process. It’s a huge mistake that’s very easy to avoid.

Product Demos Aren’t Everything
Businesses generally buy software in a six-step process:

  • ID the software requirements
  • Create an RFP
  • Send the RFP to vendors you want to evaluate
  • Narrow the vendors list down based on their responses to the RFP
  • Watch product demos from the shortlisted vendors
  • Pick one vendor.

Pretty straightforward, right?
But this widely used process fails to answer one key question: how will the software actually perform in real life?
Sure, demos are important — they showcase the product in the best light and, if a demo goes poorly, it’s a major red flag. But many organizations overvalue them when making their software selections, often building a strong emotional connection to the product due to a flashy presentation, appealing color scheme or familiar UI. Is it any surprise that in the Cover Oregon case, the demo went wonderfully? It’s supposed to: it was designed specifically for that presentation but had not been battle-tested for real-world deployment.

Demos are examples of best-case scenarios, beautifully designed with feature-rich, highly controlled environments meant to sell you. They are NOT perfect examples of what your version of the software will look like when it’s deployed. For that you need to take the final but most important step in the buying process, adding a proof-of-concept (POC).

The Proof of Concept Phase
You’ve seen the demo and it looks great. Maybe you’re smitten and ready to buy. But wait! Before you pull the trigger, you need to see how the software will work against your specific use cases and in an environment similar to yours. You need a POC.

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Dept of Finance Embraces Drupal for Centralised Government-wide CMS [Sept. 15, 2014]

Submitted on
lundi, le 15 septembre 2014h
,
Government Technology Review

The Commonwealth Department of Finance will build its centralised govCMS Web-content platform on a content management system (CMS) from Acquia, the company announced today after an extensive tendering process that began in May with an open request for industry comment.

Designed to provide a centralised repository for storage and publication of government agencies’ content, the govCMS platform is intended to simplify content-management processes by shifting them to the cloud-based Acquia Cloud platform.

Acquia’s solution is based on the aGov distribution of the widely used Drupal open-source CMS, which already powers sites like Australia.gov.au and finance.gov.au that will be among the first to transfer to the govCMS environment.

“We designed govCMS to save costs while empowering agencies to act independently. We’re supporting innovation by relying on Drupal, a technology proven in governments around the world,” Australian Government CTO John Sheridan said in a statement.

“Open source technologies like Drupal, when paired with an open cloud platform like Acquia Cloud, are creating efficiencies in government and disrupting the way we deliver digital citizen experiences – for the better.”

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Fed’s Single Web System Edges Closer [Sept. 15, 2014]

Submitted on
lundi, le 15 septembre 2014h
,
GovernmentNews

By Julian Bajkowski

The federal government has moved one step closer to eliminating expensive and cumbersome legacy of disparity between its essential computing systems.

The Department of Finance has tapped Acquia Inc. to help build out a new single whole of government online content management system – called govCMS – a move that could ultimately harmonise and unite the present costly mishmash of often conflicting online systems.

According to Finance, the new “govCMS will be broadly available to Commonwealth Government entities from February 2015.”

The announcement of Acuia is the first major step in Finance’s efforts to create tangible order over the so-called whole-of-government online estate as agencies across the nation scramble to meet the deadline set by Communications Minister Malcolm Turnbull to have all “major services and interactions with individuals online” by 2017.

And although the selection of an individual vendor is important, in reality is just one step towards the core underlying commitment to use open standards for the government’s development of its online assets, especially public facing websites.

If successful, it is plausible the Commonwealth’s govCMS standard could be taken up by state and local governments given that Mr Turnbull this month conspicuously committed to extending the functionality of the “myGov” transactional hub to other jurisdictions for free.

The proliferation of incompatibilities and legacy systems in government has proved a big inhibitor to agencies of all flavours harnessing the kind of productivity increases the private sector has achieved through digitisation.

John Sheridan, the Australian Government’s Chief Technology Officer and Procurement Coordinator said Acquia will now provide “Software-as-a-Service on the Public Cloud using Drupal open source software.”

He added that Acquia will also partner “with several local businesses so that govCMS can offer a comprehensive service from website design and development through to support and managed operations.”

“I’m excited that, through govCMS, we’ll be offering a cost effective content management and website hosting solution to Commonwealth entities,” Mr Sheridan said.

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Australian Govt Signs Four-year Deal with Acquia for GovCMS [Sept. 15, 2014]

Submitted on
lundi, le 15 septembre 2014h
,
ZDNet

By Leon Spencer

The Australian government has signed a four-year contract with Acquia to help agencies implement its Drupal-based Government Content Management System, GovCMS, which is set to be available to all government entities by February.

Self-styled Drupal "enterprise facilitator" Acquia has inked a four-year deal with the Australian government to implement its Drupal-based web Government Content Management System (GovCMS).

A spokesperson for Acquia told ZDNet that the four-year agreement consists of an initial two years, with the option to extend by one year, followed by another year.

The spokesperson also said that the government's conservative forecasts for the number of websites to utilise the new system would be around 180, and possibly up to 400 sites.

Under the terms of the deal, GovCMS will be delivered on Acquia Cloud, and will incorporate Acquia Cloud Site Factory, a software-as-a-service (SaaS) application for Drupal. Government agencies will also be able to tap into the global Drupal community through Acquia.

The Australian government CTO John Sheridan said in a statement that Acquia would provide SaaS on the public cloud using the open-source Drupal framework, and would also partner with several local businesses so that GovCMS can offer a "comprehensive service" from website design and development through to support and managed operations.

"I'm excited that through GovCMS, we'll be offering a cost-effective content management and website hosting solution to Commonwealth entities," said Sheridan. "GovCMS will provide entities with the opportunity to create and manage websites, based on best practice and compliant with Australian government standards, including security and accessibility.

"We designed GovCMS to save costs while empowering agencies to act independently. We're supporting innovation by relying on Drupal, a technology proven in governments around the world. Open-source technologies like Drupal, when paired with an open cloud platform like Acquia Cloud, are creating efficiencies in government and disrupting the way we deliver digital citizen experiences.

Acquia to Deliver Government's Cloud-hosted, Open Source CMS [Sept. 15, 2014]

Submitted on
lundi, le 15 septembre 2014h
,
Computerworld

By Rohan Pearce

Firm founded by the creator of the open source Drupal project will host CMS

Boston-headquartered Drupal services company Acquia will deliver the federal government’s govCMS project.

The project to create a standard content management system for federal government agencies was announced in May.

At that time, government CTO John Sheridan indicated the open source Drupal platform delivered as software-as-a-service was the preferred choice for govCMS

Tender documents issued in June confirmed that the whole-of-government content management system would be based on Drupal.

“Acquia will partner with several local businesses so that govCMS can offer a comprehensive service from website design and development through to support and managed operations,” Sheridan wrote in a blog entry today.

“I’m excited that, through govCMS, we’ll be offering a cost effective content management and website hosting solution to Commonwealth entities. govCMS will provide entities with the opportunity to create and manage websites, based on best practice and compliant with Australian Government standards, including security and accessibility.

"Removing the burden for entities of having to own and manage software or infrastructure should allow them to focus more on their core business.”

An analysis by the Department of Finance has found that between 182 and 450 websites could be transitioned to GovCMS over four years.

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Announcement of Service Provider for govCMS [Sept. 15, 2014]

Submitted on
lundi, le 15 septembre 2014h
,
Australia Government CTO

Following the recent Request for Proposal process, I am pleased to announce Finance has engaged the services of Acquia Inc. to support the provision of the Government Content Management System.

Acquia will provide Software-as-a-Service on the Public Cloud using Drupal open source software. Acquia will partner with several local businesses so that govCMS can offer a comprehensive service from website design and development through to support and managed operations.

I’m excited that, through govCMS, we’ll be offering a cost effective content management and website hosting solution to Commonwealth entities. govCMS will provide entities with the opportunity to create and manage websites, based on best practice and compliant with Australian Government standards, including security and accessibility. Removing the burden for entities of having to own and manage software or infrastructure should allow them to focus more on their core business.

Work on the migration of australia.gov.au and finance.gov.au to the govCMS platform has commenced. In line with standard procedures for govCMS, these sites will be released following a comprehensive quality assurance process. govCMS will be broadly available to Commonwealth Government entities from February 2015. I will provide further details about the official launch of govCMS through the blog in due course.

Réseau social, le futur catalyseur du tissu économique français ? [8 Sept 2014]

Submitted on
lundi, le 8 septembre 2014h
,

Les CCI de Bourgogne ont créé un réseau social sous Drupal au service de l'économie régionale. Un outil qu'elles proposent aux autres CCI pour favoriser la généralisation de son expérience.

Tirer parti des dernières technologies de réseau social pour proposer aux entrepreneurs français un espace virtuel où se réunir, partager, échanger, lancer des projets... Tel était l'objectif des Chambres de commerce et d'industrie (CCI) de Bourgogne dès 2010. Une réflexion qui les a conduites depuis à lancer une plateforme sociale, basée sur le CMS Drupal et sa distribution Drupal Commons (développée par Acquia). Alors que le nouveau service, baptisé CCI-link, a été lancé en janvier dernier, les premiers résultats sont là : le réseau social atteint déjà 600 membres actifs, et une quinzaine de communautés thématiques.

The End of Ownership: The Zero-marginal-cost Economy [Sept. 7, 2014]

Submitted on
Dimanche, le 7 septembre 2014h
,
The Next Web

By Dries Buytaert

Society is undergoing tremendous change right now — those of us who enjoy services like Uber and Kickstarter are experiencing it firsthand. The sharing and collaboration practices of the internet are extending to transportation (Uber), hotels (Airbnb), financing (Kickstarter, LendingClub), music services (Spotify) and even software development (Linux, Drupal).

While the consumer “sharing economy” gives us a taste of what it’s like to live in a world where we own less, perhaps there’s an equally powerful message for the business community. Using collaboration, companies are dramatically reducing the production cost of their goods or services.

Welcome to the zero-marginal-cost economy, a way of doing business where ownership of a core process is surrendered to community collaboration. In economic terms, the cost of a product – or a “good” – can be divided into two parts.

The first part is a “setup cost,” which is the cost of assembling the team and tools needed to make the first unit. The second part is called the “marginal cost,” or the cost of producing a single, additional unit.

For decades, competitive markets have focused on driving productivity up and marginal costs down, enabling businesses to reduce the price of their goods and services to compete against each other and win customers.

A good example of this approach is Toyota, which completely reinvented how cars were made through lean manufacturing, changing the entire automotive industry.

Japanese cars were produced much more quickly than their American counterparts, created via traditional assembly lines in Detroit, ultimately driving down the final cost for consumers and shrinking margins for companies like Ford. Software development methodologies like the lean startup methodology and Kanban are modeled after the Toyota production line and have made software development more efficient.

Today, the focus is changing. Within service industries like hospitality and transportation, new entrants are succeeding not by optimizing production, but by eliminating production cost altogether.

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Wie aus dem Marketingleiter ein Super-CMO wird [4 Sept. 2014]

Submitted on
jeudi, 4. septembre 2014 Uhr
,
Lead Digital

Über Technologien haben Unternehmen heute die Möglichkeit, viel stärker in Kontakt mit den Kunden zu treten als zuvor. Die Fäden dafür laufen in der Marketing-Abteilung zusammen, die an jedem dieser Touchpoints eine effiziente Kundenkommunikation in Gang bringen kann. Damit hat der Marketingleiter heute die Möglichkeit, mehr aus seinem Job zu machen - und zum wahren CMO zu werden. Doch gelingt das erst, wenn der CEO die Weichen dafür stellt, erklärt Jeffrey McGuire, Open Source Evangelist beim Open Source-Dienstleister Acquia, im Interview mit LEAD digital.

In den vergangenen Jahren haben Unternehmen digitale Expertise gesammelt, meist neben ihrem eigentlichen Stammgeschäft - mit dem Resultat, dass der klassische und digitale Bereich wie zwei Welten nebenher leben, jedoch nicht zusammen operieren. Wie kann es gelingen, beide Bereiche zusammenzuführen, um ein wahrhaft digital denkendes und operierendes Unternehmen zu erhalten?

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