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Acquia

Acquia Named to Inaugural Build 100 [March 31, 2014]

Recognized for Achieving Five Years of Sustained Growth As A Company, Helps Organizations Gain Speed and Agility in Delivering Digital Experiences

BURLINGTON – March 31, 2014 – Acquia, where great digital experiences begin, today announced it was named to the Build 100, a listing of elite, U.S. mid-market companies that have achieved sustained growth during each of the past five years.

Boston’s next 12 tech IPOs? [March 20, 2014]

Submitted on
Donnerstag, 20. März 2014 Uhr
,
BetaBoston

By Kyle Alspach

Acquia, cloud hosting for content management system Drupal. IPO guess: Early 2015. No hurry to go public, but revenue growth (to nearly $70 million last year) already suggests IPO readiness. Boston tech may have gone more than a year-and-a-half in between its last two venture-backed tech IPOs (i.e. Exa Corp. and Care.com, which went public in January). But the region’s tech community shouldn’t have to wait that long again any time soon.

These Women Are Building The Software That Quietly Runs The World [Feb. 9, 2014]

Submitted on
Sonntag, 9. Februar 2014 Uhr
,
Business Insider

It's no secret that there are far fewer women technologists working in the industry than men.
When it comes to computer-related jobs, men outnumber women at a rate of about 4 to 1.

And when it comes to the open-source software industry, women are even harder to find. A recent study found that 1 out 10 open-source programmers are women (about 10%), and that's up from 2007, when only 2 out of every 100 were women (about 2%).

The lack of women gives the tech industry, and particularly the open-source portion of it, a distinctly sexist feel.

Despite these sad statistics, it is absolutely possible for a woman in the field to go far and have a fabulous career. So we asked the Linux Foundation, the granddaddy of all open-source projects, to give us a list of stand-out women doing fabulous work.

Linux is an operating system software (a competitor to Microsoft Windows) that is quietly running the world. It is the foundation of the Android operating system. It's the software behind a lot of consumer tech, from televisions to washing machines. It is used in nearly every corporate data center and on most supercomputers. It powers everything from banks to nuclear submarines.

So, here's our list of women with awesome careers working on Linux, the tech that's quietly running the world...

Angie Byron, Director of Community Development at Acquia
Acquia is the commercial arm of Drupal, a free open-source content management system for websites. Drupal is another hugely popular open-source project and is often used on servers running Linux.

Byron has been a face in the open-source software world since 2011, when she was the first women to be featured on the cover of Linux Journal.

She's been involved with open source since the mid-'90s, she said, because she loves how it lets anyone "tinker with" software written by others.

"I’ve found that the community of folks I've encountered in Drupal, Linux and other open-source projects is also simply amazing: friendly, intelligent (but down to earth about it), hilarious, sincere, and endlessly passionate."

Maintaining your installed Drupal distro

Top 5 Marketing Tech Predictions for 2014 [Jan. 6, 2014]

Submitted on
Montag, 6. Januar 2014 Uhr
,
CMSWire

By Tom Wentworth, Acquia CMO

Technology adoption has become a competitive differentiator for CMOs who strive to out-innovate their competitors. There is so much opportunity for brands to strengthen consumer engagement through their digital channels. So, with 2014 upon us, it’s time to look at how websites and digital experiences will change in the year to come. What is the future of the branded website? How will technology change customers’ online shopping experience?
Here are my top marketing tech predictions for 2014.

1. CMOs Will Take Back Control
Over the core components of the digital customer experience that is. Many of these digital customer channels, like websites, mobile devices and social networks, were offloaded to IT in the past. But in 2014, CMOs will take back the control over this content to ensure the brand image is accurately portrayed on the customer facing end.

2. Evolve or Die
Ok, this might be a bit of an overused statement, but it does hold some truth. Stemming from taking back control from the IT teams, CMOs will put a greater value on agility and integration over single vendor solutions in 2014. In today’s digital age, CMOs must embrace the shift to digital or risk being phased out in favor of digital natives who understand how business and technology meet.

An entirely new job title —Chief Digital Officer — has emerged because marketing leaders, to date, have not fully embraced the disruptive nature of digital. CMOs who don't evolve will face the harsh reality of marketing in a world where digital experiences are customer experiences.

3. Content Meets Commerce
Recent data from Forrester Research shows that Web Content Management and e-commerce are the top two priorities for digital executives. Next year, I believe the lines between these two priorities will blur. Customers want the opportunity to review great content while shopping online, and visa versa.

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Acquia's Dries Buytaert 'Not Interested in the Hype' [Dec. 26, 2013]

Submitted on
Donnerstag, 26. December 2013 Uhr
,
Boston Business Journal

In 1999, Dries Buytaert made the decision to spend "a couple nights" working on a message board for himself and other computer science students at the University of Antwerp to use.

“That ended up being 13 years of my life,” said Buytaert, whose project evolved into Drupal, an open-source content management system and site development platform now powering more than 2 percent of the world’s websites.

Drupal provides Web developers with a free set of tools and is particularly tailored to sites that have a lot of content that is continuously being updated, as well as sites that need to serve a large number of registered users.

Drupal now has more than 1 million users in 228 countries, and Buytaert continues to serve as the project lead for Drupal as well as president of the nonprofit Drupal Association.

“I very much feel like I’m an accidental leader,” Buytaert said. “I enjoy what I do and feel great about what I do, but I never planned to build software that would be so widely used.”

Growing A Mo: Lessons Learned From The Movember Project [Dec 19, 2013]

Submitted on
Donnerstag, 19. December 2013 Uhr
,
MediaPost

By Bryan House

Were any of your colleagues or friends sporting awkward moustaches until recently? If so, it’s likely they were among the thousands of Mo-Bros taking part in the worldwide Movember movement committed to raising funds and awareness for men’s health, specifically prostate cancer and other cancers that affect men. Those awkward moustaches were unavoidable at my office. My company has been an active and proud participant for the past four years; last month more than 80 participants and hundreds of contributors helped raise $38,000 as part of Acquia’s "Mo Drupal" team this year.

The success of Movember is no fluke. From its founding a decade ago in Melbourne, the Movember moustache has expanded to more than two dozen countries. In fact, it’s the simple act of growing a moustache that has encouraged several hundred thousand men around the world to become walking billboards for the — quite literal — face of men’s health, an extremely successful strategy that has helped the annual fundraiser gain momentum. These “Mo Bros” (and their ever-supportive and patient Mo Sistas) raise awareness by prompting private and public conversations about men’s health. They also raise an amazing amount of funds for programs that support men’s health initiatives; Movember donations this year surpassed $106 million worldwide.

According to Mark Hedstrom, the U.S. director for the effort, “Movember is about getting men to engage in a fun and somewhat irreverent campaign. By supporting a fun environment, men start engaging more in their personal health.”

So how has the Movember Foundation had so much success engaging such a vast group of men? Let’s take a look at the top three things: language, competition and keeping it fun.

5 Experiences Commerce Websites Should Replicate from the Apple Store [Dec. 6, 2013]

Submitted on
Montag, 30. December 2013 Uhr
,
The Next Web

By Tom Wentworth, Acquia CMO

Whether you’re an Android or iOS user, we’ve all probably made our way into an Apple store at some point. After pushing past the suspiciously friendly blue-shirted door greeters, the in-store experience is actually quite pleasant. It’s a far cry from what you’d expect from a massive consumer goods retailer; people actually seem to be enjoying themselves in the stores and are eager to come back.

Unlike big-box retailers who couldn’t care less about which products you buy (as long as you buy something), Apple controls its brand message and experience within its stores. The result is a unique brand engagement that’s a win for both the Apple name and the consumer. This is exactly the experience Apple intends.

Apple has largely been successful in creating an in-store shopping experience that’s as simple, dynamic, and stress-free as a visit to its online store. While brick-and-mortar retailers are seemingly shutting their doors left and right, Apple stores seem to keep popping up around the world.

That got us thinking: what tactics did Apple implement in some of its physical stores that every retailer and brand can adopt? Here’s a list of five

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Breaking Bad Habits in IT: Avoid the Suite Trap [Dec. 2, 2013]

Submitted on
Montag, 2. December 2013 Uhr
,
CMSWire

By Tom Wentworth

It’s time to break some bad habits. Fifteen years ago, CIOs bought into expensive technology suites that offered a “one stop shop” for every digital project on their agenda. These suites consolidated a range of applications into one package, offered by a large vendor like Oracle, SAP or IBM. But these “one stop shops” proved to be a bad investment. Individual applications rolled into suites became old news, and CIOs found themselves locked into their investments while companies like Salesforce.com and Workday took a majority of the market share away from applications in suites.

And now history is repeating itself …

CIO budgets are shifting toward the CMO, encouraging large marketing technology providers to recreate the types of suites big tech companies introduced years ago, targeted specifically to CMOs. These large packages pieced together from individual applications that guide every process of planning, creating and implementing marketing campaigns do not offer the dynamic solution marketers need in today’s digital age.

Reason To Be Thankful: Being Named A Fast-Growing Tech Company [Nov. 27, 2013]

Submitted on
Mittwoch, 27. November 2013 Uhr
,
SemanticWeb.com

By Jennifer Zaino

It’s got to be a happy Thanksgiving for a number of tech companies that made their way to Deloitte’s recently-released Technology Fast 500. The 2013 ranking of the fastest-growing tech companies based in North America also has something to show for anyone who’s doubted that there’s money to be made taking advantage of semantic and other Web 3.0 concepts, a look at the list should show it’s time for the doubting to stop.

Have a look at some of the winners with their overall rankings:

#2 Acquia. Drupal claims the title of being the first mainstream content management system to support semantic web technology in its core. The Drupal-powered project Acquia was co-founded by Drupal creator Dries Buytaert to provide cloud, SaaS, and other services to organizations building websites on Drupal – and has on staff software engineer Stéphane Corlosquet, who had a big hand in bringing those semantic capabilities to Drupal’s core. In fact, Corlosquet spoke at the most recent SemTechBiz about Acquia as an example of a Drupal-powered project managing its content as Linked Data.

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