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Are you thinking like a marketer? If not, you should be!

If there’s one thing I’ve learned it’s that traditional notions of “marketer” are long gone. Ten years ago you’d pretty much be able to categorize marketers into one or a few main buckets. We hung out at tradeshows, we had a handful of tools at our disposal to measure customer acquisition, engagement and ROI. For the most part we all worked in the same department- the marketing department. I was at Lotus at the time. It was a great little club and to all my fellow marketers who can actually remember what it was like back then, you know what I’m talking about.

Unfortunately this post ISN’T for you! That is to say, it isn’t only for you.

Fast forward ten years and look what has happened to our marketer’s club. We now have folks from sales, IT , support and engineering and even the big wigs up in the boardroom joining the group. That’s right, today everyone is a marketer, no matter what their job function. That’s largely because almost everyone in an organization today has entered into social media one way or another, and through those social media channels they have become (whether they realize it or not) brand evangelists. Everyone is in the conversations, not just the official marketers.

For example, take the intern who you’ve tasked with scouting competitive analysis. In her research she uncovers new blogs where heated discussions are happening about just your area of business. She starts to follow these blogs and ends up posting the most interesting stories to her Facebook page where she has also connected with other employees and even some of your clients. Just like that, your business community and target audience is thrust into conversations about what matters to your business, making your intern a virtual extension of your marketing department. The problem? You have no way to pull that content and those conversations back to your brand. They now live on that intern’s Facebook page.

That’s where social publishing comes in. Social publishing lets you create a destination for communities and audiences that are becoming increasingly scattered throughout the web. My example above uses an individual within your organization, but the same applies to your customer network. Your customers and partners are also engaged in discussions that are equally as valuable to your brand and just like you need to wrangle the intern’s Facebook community, you also need a place for your customers to take their online conversations and help you build a better brand community. Social publishing with Drupal can help you do that.

I realize I’m certainly not the first marketer to espouse this “everyone is a marketer” concept. However until now, it’s been perpetually difficult to take what we know is the case and actually put it into practice.

In April, over 3,000 Drupalists (and a lot of Druplipets) were gathered together at DrupalCon in San Francisco. As Tom Erickson talked about in his last video post, this year drew people from all corners of the business spectrum. In the past, DrupalCon has primarily been a forum for the vibrant developer community. This year, in addition to developers we had more designers, marketers, and business leaders than ever before. To me this signaled that the idea of “everyone/everywhere marketing” is catching fire and organizations are looking at Drupal as the way to execute on this concept.

For more great examples of social publishing community building, check out our case studies. You can also take a look at a Social Publishing whitepaper specifically for marketers that we put together, or view an Acquia webinar that I gave on how Drupal can give marketers a competitive advantage.

Are you a marketer without a marketing title? If so, comment here and share your challenges and successes!

Comments

Posted on by Jimania (not verified).

I've made the transition from "old school" and will state that today's marketers have to be smarter, more flexible and sometimes very bold. In the "old days" you attended trade shows, did print ads and had lot's of business lunches or dinners. Now trade show floors are generally time wasters, print ads are generally ineffective for driving sales and the lunch/dinner is out - namely because people are not truly interested in developing meaningful business relationships. Today you have to use a flurry of quick, creative impressions through emails, tweats, postings, phone calls, etc. all geared at a "what's in it for me" customer. Personally, I miss the relationships, loyalty and friendships of the old days.

In the "old days", (pre internet) it was more difficult to find numerous suppliers so your competition was usually limited to local or regional companies with field salespeople. Now your competitors from around the world are at your customer's desks 24/7 on search engines. Inversely, I'm glad that I can now be found by a larger audience so this one is a break-even of sorts.

Like it or not, things always change. We provide
Website Design Atlanta GA so we defintely have to be creative, aggressive and energetic in the pursuit of new business!