Acquia Coverage

The API-ificiation of software – and LEGOs [May 28, 2012]

Submitted on
Monday, May 28, 2012
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Gigaom

Today everything has an API. Facebook has hundreds of APIs across such social areas as friends, photos, likes and events. Google has thousands of APIs across search/AdWords, Web analytics, YouTube, maps, email and many more. Amazon has APIs that cover the spectrum from Alexa Web traffic rankings to e-commerce product and pricing information and even the ability to start and stop individual machines. I spent a decade architecting and building component and services based software, and another decade after that evaluating and investing in infrastructure software, I believe this mobile and cloud influenced wave of RESTful service-oriented software may finally live up to its initial promise.

Although the majority of API attention has centered on consumer Web services, an emerging cadre of startups are focused on infrastructure and business processes. These newcomers are providing a broad range of critical services neatly packaged as frameworks or APIs. Some of these companies, such as Salesforce and Google Maps, are next generation SaaS providers that have built solutions to serve both end users and developers. Others, including Mailchimp and Twilio, are pure play offerings that solely target developers as customers.

2012 Future of Open Source Survey Results Are In [May 25, 2012]

Submitted on
Friday, May 25, 2012
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Gigaom

The Open Source Business Conference (OSBC) is in full swing in San Francisco this week, and, in conjunction with it, Black Duck Software and North Bridge Venture Partners are out with the results of their 2012 Future of Open Source Survey. These annual surveys have a good record of picking key open source trends and providing good forecasts. For example, the same survey has made accurate predictions about the cloud computing and mobile technology scenes in recent years, as well as the rise of open source Business Intelligence software. Here are some of the findings from the 2012 survey.

There were 740 respondents for this year's survey, and non-vendors made up 59 percent of respondents. Among respondents, 62 percent said that open source applications and platforms represented more than half of their software deployments. When asked what makes open source attractive, respondents said "freedom from vendor lock-in," "lower costs," and "quality," were paramount.

Web Optimization Firm Yottaa Closes $9M Series B Funding Round [May 22, 2012]

Submitted on
Tuesday, May 22, 2012
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Web Host Industry Review

Web optimization provider Yottaa announced on Tuesday that it has closed $9 million in Series B funding. The round of funding will be used towards accelerating the delivery of its services that optimize, protect and monitor websites for SMBs, and other organizations.

Existing Yottaa investors, General Catalyst Partners, Stata Venture Partners and Cambridge West Ventures participated in the round, and were joined by an additional undisclosed investor.

This funding round comes a week after Yottaa launched its solution for mobile acceleration, combining its patented front-end optimization service with a global content delivery network. Its mobile acceleration solution currently has more than 30 million users, according to the press release.

Web hosts that are looking for a solution that combines site speed optimization, mobile optimization and a CDN may consider partnering with Yottaa. The referral or reseller program could be a fit for web hosts that want to deliver faster websites to their customers. HostMySite ad Acquia are existing Yottaa partners.

Sixth Annual Future Of Open Source Survey Results Point to Era of “Open Innovation On Demand” [May 21, 2012]

Submitted on
Monday, May 21, 2012
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Black Duck Software

Open Source Fueling Innovation in Mobile and Cloud; Quality a Top Reason for Enterprise Adoption

Open Source Business Conference (OSBC), SAN FRANCISCO – May 21, 2012 North Bridge Venture Partners and Black Duck Software today announced the results of the sixth annual Future of Open Source Survey. Conducted in partnership with The 451 Group, the 2012 survey reveals that open source software (OSS) is leading innovation in major technology segments including mobile, cloud and big data, as well as creating innovative business models such as Open SaaS. The quality of open source, and the ability to continuously improve, is now one of the top reasons for its adoption.

"The 2012 Future of Open Source Survey reveals the OSS market is thriving. This year's results show an important shift in respondents' view of OSS, focusing less on cost and more on how OSS can innovate and help create industries. Taken together with applications like mobile and enabled by cloud, we are entering an exciting new era of 'Open Innovation on Demand,' where not only can OSS innovate faster, it can be deployed immediately and consumed as a service from the cloud," said Michael Skok, General Partner, North Bridge Venture Partners.

Innovative Technology Leaders Show Support For NetSuite SuiteCommerce [May 15, 2012]

Submitted on
Tuesday, May 15, 2012
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Yahoo FInance

SAN FRANCISCO, May 15, 2012 /PRNewswire/ -- NetSuite SuiteWorld 2012 -- NetSuite Inc. (N), the industry's leading provider of cloud-based financials / ERP software suites, today announced that leading technology innovators have embraced the NetSuite "Commerce as a Service" (CaaS) initiative and the new NetSuite SuiteCommerce platform, delivering next-generation commerce solutions and integrations that enrich the platform with valued-added functionality such as social ratings, reviews and conversations, social CRM, product data and image syndication, personalized product recommendations, rich media management, mobile device payments, and credit card payment processing. NetSuite "Commerce as a Service" (CaaS) enables businesses to manage their interactions with other businesses and directly with consumers via a cloud platform that delivers a desired customer experience, via any current device, directly on the core NetSuite ERP/CRM business management application. At the heart of CaaS is NetSuite SuiteCommerce, a new commerce-aware platform that provides a central system to manage all transactions with consumers and other businesses regardless of touchpoint (website, smart phone, tablet, or social media site).

These landmark partnerships between NetSuite and disruptive technology providers that are helping reshape commerce, such as Square, Stripe, Acquia, Bazaarvoice, GoDataFeed, MyBuys, Shotfarm and Velaro, strengthen the CaaS initiative and the SuiteCommerce platform, which combines a state-of-the-art Web storefront with a central system to manage all B2C and B2B transactions across any touchpoint, including websites, smartphones, tablets, social media and physical point of sale (POS). Operating directly on the core NetSuite ERP/CRM business management application, SuiteCommerce is designed to address the limitations and complexity of first-generation commerce systems to enable merchants to streamline business processes, build relationships with built-in marketing tools and immerse customers in a richly interactive and intuitive shopping experience.

Mobile app dev at heart of website redesign [May 9, 2012]

Submitted on
Wednesday, May 9, 2012
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Search CIO

Michael Le Du and his development team have become rather successful at getting beautiful women to share pictures of themselves. In fact, they make it look easy. Lest there be some misunderstanding, there's nothing untoward happening here -- just a little website redesign.

Le Du is chief technology officer at New York City-based Maxim magazine, which is published by Alpha Media Group Inc. Here, the good-looking gal next door is good for ROI. He is one of a growing number of IT leaders rethinking their website design strategies as business and customer needs continue to shift to a consumer-friendly, mobile-app-centric world.

In January the popular men's lifestyle magazine relaunched its website with an eye toward an enhanced mobile user experience and back-end agility. Le Du successfully got Maxim off its legacy content management system and onto an open source CMS in partnership with Acquia Inc., a commercial open source software vendor for the Drupal open source Web development platform.

App dev a way to improve user experience
"Hometown Hotties" was part of Maxim's ambitious three-month website redesign. The "hotties" also happen to be a good example of the growing importance of mobile app dev in enhancing the user experience. What's good for the user is good for the business.

Hometown Hotties is a longstanding Maxim feature. Essentially, women submit images and information about themselves from any device. Site users vote for their favorites, and the women with the most votes move on to increasingly competitive rounds until a favorite is chosen and becomes a Hometown Hottie. The winner becomes a spokesperson for Maxim -- which wins too, in that it gains new promotional options... Read more.

Dries Buytaert: Open source entrepreneur [May 3, 2012]

Submitted on
Thursday, May 3, 2012
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Business Insider

GrowthBusiness sits down with Drupal founder Dries Buytaert to find out when the platform really started to take off and how the inventor-cum-entrepreneur is planning on monitising Drupal through open source software company Acquia.

IBM’s SugarCRM Deal Is a Sweet Sign for Commercial Open Source Software [May 1, 2012]

Submitted on
Tuesday, May 1, 2012
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CIO Journal

IBM’s recent decision to replace its Oracle Siebel customer management system with SugarCRM’s web-based application is a big vote of confidence in commercial open source software.

Commercial open source software can be appealing to corporations because it often includes legal protections, quality controls and customer service. It has been used by startups such as Eucalyptus, which provides software for private clouds, and Acquia, which provides service and support for Drupal open-source content management systems.

The combination of open source code and quality controls helps companies such as SugarCRM compete with much larger rivals such as Oracle and Salesforce.com, which sell software based on proprietary standards.

17 Enterprise Startups To Bet Your Career On [May 2, 2012]

Submitted on
Wednesday, May 2, 2012
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Business Insider

Acquia has a famous founder and is the go-to company for millions of web sites.

Company: Acquia
Location: Burlington, MA
What it does: The support and hosting arm for companies using Drupal. Drupal is a popular free, open source content management systems used to build websites.
Founded: 2007
Funding: $38.5 million
Why it's hot: Drupal was written by Dries Buytaert when he was college and it organically grew into a massively popular CMS today.

Companies turning to enterprise social business for collaboration, integration [April 25, 2012]

Submitted on
Wednesday, April 25, 2012
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Search Manufacturing ERP

The explosion in open source computing and cloud computing options has created a new level of thinking in the design of enterprise process execution and how these processes use -- or simply integrate with-- traditional and proprietary software. So-called Tier 2 computing, which combines the on-premises applications traditionally used to execute business processes with cloud-based applications, is also gaining acceptance, particularly where formal operations are temporarily needed (such as mergers and acquisitions) or user levels have not achieved critical mass to deploy a full instance of an application. Enterprise social business tools sit at the crossroads of these trends.

With enterprise social business tools, organizations can leverage the collaborative effects of having processes executed within their “four walls” or throughout their value chain in either a cloud-based or on-premises environment, using either a proprietary or open source platform. Key organizational functions such as purchasing, supplier management and product development appear to be good candidates for enterprise social business. Early results look promising.

Open source computing options for collaboration

I recently had the opportunity to drop in on the DrupalCon 2012 event in Denver. Drupal is an open source computing platform that allows for a number of enterprise-wide activities to be executed in a secure and structured environment. To date, larger traditional platforms that are widely used for program microsites and collaboration--such as Microsoft SharePoint--and enterprise data management (EDM) platforms, such as Oracle mySQL, provide ready-to-use application program interfaces (APIs) to Drupal and other components of a Linux application management process commonly referred to as LAMP.

Dorm room to boardroom [April 17, 2012]

Submitted on
Tuesday, April 17, 2012
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Growth Business UK

Describing himself as an academic at heart, Dries Buytaert never thought of charging people for the system that now sits behind one in 50 websites. GrowthBusiness finds out how he’s monetising Drupal while staying true to its open source principles.

It’s a scene familiar from movie screens: a Red Bull-guzzling university student programming away into the small hours on a venture destined to change the world.

However, for Dries Buytaert the hours spent burning the midnight oil during his final year of a Masters degree have turned his hobby into a business that is now powering 2 per cent of global websites.

Drupal, an open source content management system, was devised by the Belgian national to allow users to build websites with functions such as blogging and RSS feeds. Like Facebook’s Mark Zuckerberg, Buytaert began with modest ideas about the potential of the tool he was creating.

‘I initially wanted to build a message board to exchange messages with my friends,’ Buytaert says. ‘I set out to work on it for a couple of nights, but ended up developing it for a number of years.’

Having started Drupal in 2001, Buytaert spent the next six years honing his platform, in between dipping back into academia to complete a PhD in computer science, and a quick stint at a software start-up in Belgium.

Critical mass
It was then that all the work began to pay off. ‘I remember one day, I think it was 2006 or 2007, when all of a sudden MTV UK started using Drupal, and then NASA started to as well. That was a personal moment, it felt like additional responsibility,’ he adds.

However, Drupal still hadn’t made Buytaert a penny. Its widespread adoption was driven by the fact that it was, and is, open source, and Buytaert refers to the ‘community’ of developers who use and add to the system. Drupal users have doubled in number each year, and it now has 1.5 million unique users per month.

‘I think open source is changing the way websites are being built, and it’s having a massive impact on the web. It’s a way of democratising the internet,’ Buytaert claims.

This was all very well, but Buytaert still didn’t have a way of turning his ‘passion’ into a full-time job. Together with Jay Batson, who founded successful unified communications company Pingtel (later acquired by Nortel), he founded Acquia in 2007.

Acquia was established to monetise the open source system that Buytaert had produced back in his university dorm, by providing products, services and technical support for Drupal.

‘For Drupal to get to the next level it needed to be successful in the enterprise, to help larger organisations use it: so that’s why we started Acquia,’ he explains.

Acquia’s UK base is in Oxford. ‘I guess I’m an academic inside,’ says Buytaert. ‘We want to attract young, ambitious people, and university towns are the place to do that. It also keeps costs down not being in the big cities.’

Buytaert won’t disclose Acquia’s turnover or profit, but he says that fundraising for the company was on the agenda from day one for a couple of reasons. ‘Firstly, we wanted to take advantage of the fact that Drupal was already established globally in order to monetise it on a worldwide scale.

‘Secondly, the kind of company that we are building is relatively human-intensive. We are in the business of providing commercial-grade support 24/7, and it takes more than just a handful of people to do that well.’

Buytaert and Batson started with a trip to Boston, Massachusetts, pitching to a group of carefully selected VCs who matched what Acquia was looking for.

Bigger appetite
For Buytaert, the difference between American and European venture capitalists is one of scale. VCs in the US have deeper pockets, as well as a desire to stay with an investee company for longer.

‘Also, the VCs we have worked with have much more operational experience than those we have met elsewhere,’ he adds. ‘All of them have been CEOs of several companies and experienced several exits.’

Following on from Acquia’s $7 million (£4.4 million) Series A funding round, which included the likes of North Bridge Venture Partners and Sigma Partners, the business has gone on to raise a further $31.5 million in growth capital. Its Series D round in July 2011 netted the company $15 million.

The process of raising funds is one that Buytaert says ‘took a lot of work’. To prepare for the Series A round, he surrounded himself with people who brought business experience to the company.

‘Building a company is all about building the right team,’ he says. ‘The best thing I’ve done is recruited a talented team of people with the right attitude, passion, integrity, knowledge and aptitude – and who are smarter than myself.
‘By surrounding myself with them I have learned a lot about building an enterprise business, and continue to learn to this day.’

Another benefit of investing early in manpower is that Buytaert can afford to take the occasional few weeks off while the business continues to hum along.

‘It also allows me to change my focus on a weekly or monthly basis. Sometimes I find myself working on different projects, while other times I am doing a lot of sales and marketing,’ he says.

Building a successful technology business takes a careful balance of resources between product development and marketing. Drupal continues to host its DrupalCon community events, where numbers have now swelled from an initial gathering of 40 people in Antwerp back in 2005 to its last get-together of more than 3,000 people in Denver during March. ‘On any given weekend there will be maybe up to five different DrupalCamps around the world,’ says Buytaert.

World leadership
In Buytaert’s view, there’s a key difference between US and European start-ups when it comes to growth strategy. ‘I feel there is a belief in Europe that it is better to own all of the company, whereas in the US they want to go fast and are willing to give up more equity in order to grow fast.’

He points out, ‘In the US, people are ok with owning a smaller piece of something bigger rather than a bigger piece of something smaller.’

This strategic rationale ultimately has an impact on success rates, he says. The reluctance to seek outside funding leads to start-ups being ‘underinvested’ and missing out on opportunities.

However, being a web entrepreneur with global ambitions is much easier than it was ten years ago, he says. The world is ‘flatter’ than it used to be, meaning that it’s easier to reach a global audience; as a result, there is room for smaller start-ups that are still profitable and healthy.

Passing it on
Buytaert’s ability to see such opportunities is one of the reasons that he works with various start-ups as an adviser, giving them the benefit of the experience he has gained through building Drupal and going through four rounds of fundraising for Acquia. ‘I try to help them out with all aspects of their business, and it’s a very interesting process for me,’ he says, adding that he would like to try his hand at angel investing in future.

Another motivation for working with start-ups is that Buytaert wishes he’d had more help himself when building Drupal.

‘When I was younger, I underestimated the value of people in your life that you can go to with hard questions. It’s important for entrepreneurs to build up their networks so that they can call upon them when they need to.’ It’s another example of the ‘community’ ethos that is central to Drupal and which Buytaert clearly relishes.

Away from his work with Drupal, Acquia, and other people’s ventures, Buytaert is having a go at bootstrapping a business himself. His start-up, Mollom, is a tool that aims to filter out spam from website comments, forum posts and contact form messages.

With a much smaller team of five, Mollom is already a ‘profitable, healthy business’ that currently filters out spam on 50,000 websites around the world.

Help at hand
It sounds like Buytaert is a busy man, but he says his days (and nights) are less frenetic than they used to be, and he’s now in a position to enjoy family life.

All-night programming sessions and back-to-back conference calls are behind him now, and he is quick to acknowledge the role of the VC capital that Acquia has secured in restoring a modicum of free time to his existence.

The beauty of Buytaert’s dorm room discovery is that the community he has built will continue to contribute towards the evolution of the platform. Its members come from different countries and cultures, but they share the passion for open source that he possesses. That’s why he isn’t overly worried about competitors.

‘We have thousands of people all around the world working 24/7 and being extremely passionate about it, often working for free. It will just blow the others away.’

Acquia and Drupal Experiencing Widespread Moves to Open Source Software [April 9, 2012]

Submitted on
Monday, April 9, 2012
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Sand Hill

Quickly growing open source software company Acquia provides products, services and support for enterprises using the open source Drupal social publishing system. I spoke with CEO Tom Erickson about the hot trends today and how open source will impact enterprises in the next few months.

European public services must follow Iceland's open-source lead [April 5, 2012]

Submitted on
Thursday, April 5, 2012
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Public Service Europe

To many in the private sector, the idea of super-size contracts that are expensive to run and almost impossible to break free from seems ludicrous. Jim Shaw explains more...

Digital Bungalow Named Enterprise Select Partner of Acquia [April 2, 2012]

Submitted on
Monday, April 2, 2012
,
Yahoo News

Acquia, the leading provider of commercial solutions for Drupal, has named Digital Bungalow an Enterprise Select Partner. For web development firms, this is the most distinguished partnership possible, made with just 16 firms globally. The partnership provides Digital Bungalow with the highest level of field assistance and support for their Drupal initiatives.

"We’re thrilled to be recognized by Acquia as one of the world’s leading Drupal development firms. Digital Bungalow developers are on the leading edge of custom Drupal development for websites, mobile, and eCommerce," said Nate Wolfson, President of Digital Bungalow. "We have recently built websites for Humana and Showcase Cinemas on the Drupal platform, and with the help of Acquia, we are able to streamline, customize and maximize our clients’ CMS capabilities."

“Digital Bungalow has become a valuable partner and Drupal advocate,” said Tim Bertrand, VP of Worldwide Field Sales at Acquia. “We look forward continuing to strengthen our partnership and the benefit that will bring to both organizations.”

Acquia's partnership with Digital Bungalow builds on Drupal's continued success. Drupal is one of the world’s largest, open-source content management systems that empowers non-technical users to easily update their website content. With nearly 14,000 contributed modules, developers can piece modules together to build an effective content management system, tailored to the needs of the client.

About Digital Bungalow
Founded in 1999, digital marketing and technology agency Digital Bungalow develops websites, custom applications, and marketing campaigns that drive business results for regional and national businesses. Clients include Bob’s Discount Furniture, Carrier Corporation, Dow Jones, Humana, and Showcase Cinemas. For more information, visit www.digitalbungalow.com or @DigitalBungalow on Twitter.

About Acquia™, The Enterprise Guide To Drupal
Acquia empowers enterprises with the open-source social publishing system Drupal. Co-founded by Drupal's creator in 2007, Acquia helps customers manage their growth and scale their online properties with confidence. Acquia's products, cloud infrastructure, and support enable companies to realize the full power of Drupal while minimizing risk, as it's done for 2,000 enterprise customers including Twitter, Al Jazeera, Turner, World Economic Forum, Stanford University, New York Senate and NPR. See who's using Drupal at www.drupalshowcase.com and for more information please visit www.acquia.com or call 888-9-ACQUIA.

Red Hat Becomes First Billion Dollar Open Source Firm [March 29, 2012]

Submitted on
Thursday, March 29, 2012
,
Tech Week Europe

Red Hat has fulfilled its long-held ambition to be the first open source company to do a $1 billion in annual revenue.

The company, which provides servoce and support for Linux based systems to businesses, has been aiming for this goal for several years, but announced in a conference call yesterday, that it had finally beaten that barrier with 965.6m in subscription sales and $167.5m in services sales over its financial year, which ended in February.

Open source consulting is up
Red Hat’s growth was particularly high, with subscriptions and services up 25 percent and 23 percent respectively, said CEO Jim Whitehurst in a celebratory conference call.

Red Hat’s model of converting users of free software into paying customers has played well in the recession, and increasing government support for open source has worked in its favour.

And these are not small contracts. The conference call revealed that Red Had has done more than thirty deals greater than $1 million in the last year, and even has three $5 million deals.

The large deals tend to include Red Hat’s JBoss middleware, and its enterprise virtualisation product RHEV.

Red Hat has done well from the cloud, given that its business model allows easy expansion. At the same time as its earnings announcement, the company announced service level agreements for OpenShift, its platform as a service (PaaS) product.

Red Hat is very much the exception on open source companies, and smaller brethren gathered to pat it on the back: “This is a huge milestone for the open source software industry, and signals the coming of age for the OSS business model,” said Tom Erickson, chief executive of Acquia.

“Reaching the billion dollar mark is a major achievement for any organisation, and today’s news demonstrates that open source innovation can survive and thrive despite challenging economic conditions. This announcement is also a tribute to the limitless talents of the developer community, proving that a collaborative approach can deliver, not only innovation, but also spectacular results.”

Alert: What's Coming for Open Source CMS in April 2012 [March 29, 2012]

Submitted on
Friday, March 30, 2012
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CMS Wire

Welcome to the March 2012 installment of our what's coming from the open source projects in the next month. If you feel that your project was left out, we invite you to email us at pr@cmswire.com to have a project representative added to the list of people we contact for updates.

Acquia Offers Drupal-Tuned Cloud API [March 28, 2012]

Submitted on
Wednesday, March 28, 2012
,
Tech Week Europe

The Acquia Cloud is a platform-as-a-service offering that already hosts hundreds of Drupal websites, with about 1 billion page views per month.

Acquia Launches New Cloud API for Drupal Content Management [March 27, 2012]

Submitted on
Tuesday, March 27, 2012
,
eWeek

The Acquia Cloud is a Drupal-tuned platform as a service (PaaS) that currently hosts hundreds of Drupal sites, serving more than 5 billion http requests and about 1 billion page views per month.

Calls for government to help IT sector grow [March 26, 2012]

Submitted on
Monday, March 26, 2012
,
Empty Lemon

Prospects for IT jobs at smaller companies could be boosted by an improved nationwide infrastructure and strategic tax breaks.

Dries Buytaert's Software Powers A Million Important Websites — And He Built It From His Couch [March 24, 2012]

Submitted on
Saturday, March 24, 2012
,
Business Insider

Dries Buytaert is programming wunderkind. He learned to program when he was six years old -- even before he could read.
Today he is internationally famous as the creator of Drupal, one of the world's most successful open source projects.
And it all happened by accident.

Drupal is a free, open source content management system that powers a million websites including some of the biggest or most important like the White House, NASA and Twitter. Nearly 790,000 people in 228 countries contribute to it.

"This was never intentional. I'm an accidental leader. I love what I'm doing but never envisioned this to happen," he told Business Insider.
Although he's been working on Drupal for over 12 years, for most of that time, he never made a dime on it. This changed about four years ago when he founded

Acquia in Boston. Acquia is already wildly successful. It provides technical support for Drupal, has a Software-as-a-Service program similar to Wordpress.com and does web hosting via a service called Drupal Gardens. The company has nearly 2,000 customers, with Drupal Gardens hosting over 100,000 websites including huge sites like Arabic news network Al Jazeera.

Acquia has raised $38.5 million in venture funding, backed by North Bridge, Sigma Partners, Tenaya Capital and Tim O'Reilly's O'Reilly AlphaTech Ventures.
"We've grown from two people in 2008 to over 200 people today. We're looking to add another 100 to 120 people," he says. That makes Acquia one of the fastest-growing startups in Boston and named to Forbes most-promising list.

Because Drupal and Acquia isn't enough, Buytaert also has a second startup, Mollom, a comment spam blocking service for use with Drupal sites.
And it all started because because Buytaert wanted to build a private intranet for his college roommates so they could leave messages like when to meet for dinner. It was 1999, Buytaert was 21 and experimenting with new web technologies at the time, PHP and MySQL.

When he moved out of the dorm, he put this project on the Web and blogged about it. People discovered his blog and the Drupal web site and started asking him to add features, so he released it as an open source project so they could do it themselves.

He had some experience with open source. When he was barely out of high school he stumbled across this thing called Linux being built by some guy named Linus Torvalds. Buytaert contributed code to Linux for wireless network drivers.

Torvalds would eventually become one of his advisors on how to make a living from his open source project.

At each point along the way, Buytaert was shocked to discover how big Drupal was becoming. "There were multiple tipping points," he says. In 2005 he organized the first Drupal conference in Antwerp, Buytaert's home town. "40 people showed up. I couldn't believe it. Drupal was was something I would do from my couch at night. To think that 40 people traveled to Belgium to talk about Drupal for a week -- I really felt like it was huge."

But the world really changed when he found out big users had adopted Drupal. "I remember NASA and MTV switching to Drupal. I felt additional responsibility, more weight on my shoulders. Real organizations are now using this to fulfill real business missions."

Drupal isn't the only open source CMS around: there are others, like Joomla and Wordpress. But Buytaert says that in the open source world, these projects collaborate more than they compete.

Drupal is known for extreme versatility. It's even been called "the Justin Bieber of CMS," by one of the contract developers who built Whitehouse.gov. Bieber can sing, dance, and make money.

And, now, thanks to Acquia, so can Buytaert. At least that last part.

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