Thanks a Million, Drupal [March 4, 2014]

Submitted on
Tuesday, March 4, 2014
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Computerworld

By Rohan Pearce

More than a million websites are powered by the open source CMS

Drupal, an open source content management system, now powers more than 1 million websites, according to figures released today. As of 15 February, 1,005,489 websites were powered by the CMS, according to the Drupal Association, a non-profit organisation that stewards the project.

(The figure was generated by an automated Drupal.org tool, and doesn't include sites running on versions earlier than 6.0.)

Some 12 per cent of the world's top 100,000 website have been built with Drupal, according to research by Builtwith Research cited by the Drupal Association.

It's heady stuff for an open source project born out of the desire of its creator, Dries Buytaert, to experiment with Web technologies.

"When I started Drupal, honestly I didn't have a master plan at all," Buytaert told Computerworld Australia in an interview last year.

"I started Drupal as a message board because I felt it was fun to build and we could actually use it in our student dorm. That kind of evolved into an experimental platform for me so I could experiment with different kinds of Web technologies from RSS feeds to blogging to other things.

"Eventually I moved my website from an internal, intranet kind of forum to the public Internet and that actually attracted an audience of people interested in the future of the Web."

Visitors to his site had a range of suggestions for modifications. "And so eventually I said, 'You know what — instead of me doing all the work how about I just give you the source code and then you can add these things yourself and feel free to send me back a patch'," Buytaert said.

"I kind of slapped the GPL licence on it, because that's what I knew from working on the Linux kernel, and I probably spent about 30 seconds thinking of a name — 'call it Drupal' — and uploaded a zipfile to my website for other to download...

"I had worked hard on it for a year and I was kind of proud of what I built, but I never expected a whole lot of people to adopt it."

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