Acquia Coverage

Moving onto Acquia Drupal

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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CMS Report

Last year I was one of the beta testers for Acquia's Drupal distribution and the Acquia Network. I was evaluating Acquia's products and services for a potential intranet project at work. For this particular project, unfortunately, it looks as if Acquia or Drupal wasn't the right solution. Our regional folks wanted a solution similar to Microsoft's Sharepoint that is more integrated with Microsoft Office and heavily featured in document management. That's alright though because there are a number of smaller intranet projects at work where Drupal is the perfect solution and a lot of progress is being made in that direction.

Over the weekend, I decided to move CMS Report from Drupal 6 to Acquia Drupal. In December, I received a message that beta testers would be rolled over into "a Community subscription entitlement that extends through December 31st, 2009". Placing the Acquia subscription onto CMSReport.com not only will allow the site to receive the benefits of being on Acquia's network, but will also allow me to monitor the evolution of Acquia. Acquia is still a young company and likely will continue to expand on the products and services it offers.

Drupal CMS Founder, Dries Buytaert Interview with CMS Critic

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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CMS Critic

We were very pleased to have a chance to interview Dries Buytaert, founder of the legendary Drupal content management system. He shares his thoughts on its success, future and how it came to be in this intriguing and indepth discussion. We had so many questions, that we are only publishing part one while he works on the second half. Here you go.

CC: Thank you for taking the time to speak with us today, Dries. We’d like to cover a few areas during this interview.. specifically Drupal and your latest venture, Acquia.

CC: Can you tell us a little about your background and how you became involved in the world of Content Management Systems?

DB: I was a student at the University of Antwerp in Belgium around 1999. I was doing web development with CGI and server-side includes, but I wanted to learn more about technologies like PHP and MySQL. Also, at the same time, we had the need for an internal messaging system at our student dorm. So, I wrote a simple message board. Then when I graduated, I decided to move my internal message board onto the internet.

CC: Our understanding is that Drupal originally started as a BBS system, having been very involved in the BBS realm ourselves, we find this very interesting. Can you tell us a little bit about how it came to be and was it as popular as a BBS as it is today?

DB: Drupal began as an internal message board that I used to manage my student activities. We just used it in my student dorm to communicate about dinner times, etc. Once I graduated, I began transforming it into a news and discussion website: www.drop.org.

After a year or so, I released the software behind drop.org as Drupal 1.0.0, and Drupal officially came to be on January 15, 2001. Contributors still celebrate this as Drupal’s birthday every year.

Drupal IT Consultants Get Channel Program Option from Acquia

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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eWeek Channel Insider

Acquia is launching a new version of Drupal, an open-source content management system, which will give solution providers, IT consultants and Web developers an alternative to commercial CMS software.

With more and more businesses looking to climb on the Web 2.0 bandwagon, there's got to be a lot of opportunity for IT solution providers who can bring the benefits of a Web 2.0 implementation to end-user companies. Looking to capitalize on that trend, Acquia has created a distribution of open source Web 2.0 platform Drupal for blogs, communities, wikis and other content forms, in addition to providing subscriptions to support. The model follows how Red Hat has commercialized a Linux distribution and subscription support, according to Jeff Whatcott, vice president of marketing for Acquia.

Acquia announced its distribution of Drupal the first week in October, and on Oct. 14 the company embraced the indirect model by introducing a channel partner program targeted at IT consultants, hosting providers, ISVs with complementary technologies, and value-added distributors and resellers.

The program functions more like an affiliate program than a true reseller program, with partners realizing most of their revenues from the consulting fee they charge to customers for putting together their Web 2.0 implementation. Typically, implementations start at around $25,000, according to Whatcott. Partners also receive a commission ranging from 4 percent to 8 percent, depending on their tier in the program.

The new kid on the Drop

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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GarfieldTech

This site has been running Drupal 5 for over a year now, even though Drupal 6 has been available since February. I kept meaning to update it, but never got around to it. Of course, then along came Acquia and a pressing need to try out the new kid on the block (for purely professional reasons, of course). So, armed with proper backup tools and a fast Internet connection, I set about to sacrifice my blog on the alter of experimentation. Onwards!

The documentation, available right from the downloads page, is a fairly extensive and thorough PDF. Of particular note, it goes out of its way to specify PHP 5.2 and MySQL 5.0 as minimum requirements. Thank you, Acquia! (For RHEL 5 users, who are stuck with PHP 5.1, it does point out that most of Drupal will work but, for example, Date module will have reduced functionality.)

The documentation includes lots of screenshots. Database setup is guided through phpMyAdmin, which makes sense as it's the most likely tool that all users will have available on their host. It also goes out of its way to highlight edge-case caveats, such as "Safari 3 will extract the download files for you" and "remember that .htaccess file that most FTP clients don't!" Command line instructis are provided, too, for the l33t crowd.

InfoWorld Test Center review: Drupal turns pro

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
InfoWorld Test Center

As we've seen time and again, in an increasing number of enterprise software categories, open source has become a promising alternative to commercial software. But there's no free ride.

Support from developers is often problematic, and you need to find products with a large enough following so that programmers have an incentive to build add-on modules. When the Test Center reviewed open source CMSes (content management systems), these two factors often broke the tie between otherwise robust solutions and gave Alfresco the advantage.

Yet if you take support out of the equation, Drupal emerges as the better solution for many enterprise Web projects. That's because this social publishing solution starts with a mature Web CMS, adds a blog system, and then offers discussion forms, community features, and extensibility through 1,800 add-on modules – many of them also open source. Given this flexibility, it's not surprising that Drupal powers about 250,000 live sites – including big names such as Federal Express, The Onion, and Popular Science.

But big organization or small, there's a dark side to Drupal: You'll probably need the services of an experienced support staff or a costly consultancy that has mastered a complex setup and knows how to assemble all the building blocks into a workable system. Now, for those with limited resources, Acquia is stepping in with a commercially supported Drupal distribution along with a network that delivers patches and security updates.

Acquia Drupal

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
Collaboration and Content Strategies Blog

Yesterday Acquia, the commercial open source company started last December to serve the Drupal community, announced they are “now open for business!” Specifically, Acquia announced the availability of:

  • Acquia Drupal – a distribution of the popular content management system (previously code named “Carbon”) which provides core Drupal functionality as well as support for over thirty additional modules that were previously only supported by a community.
  • Acquia Network – a set of network services Drupal site owners can hook up to their website to improve their operation. These include software update management, spam blocking, heartbeat monitoring, and site usage statistics.
  • As part of the Acquia Network site owners also receive technical support for their Drupal installation.

Drupal is kind of a WCMS/Web 2.0 toolkit/application framework all wrapped up into one. It is a flexible solution capable of supporting a number of types of dynamic Internet-facing websites while also providing the basis for a functional intranet. Acquia likes to calls this combination “Social Publishing.” But whatever it is, there is clearly a large community that like building solutions on the product. Conservative estimates place the number of Drupal Internet sites at over 250,000.

Drupal: open-source publishing

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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Social Media

I hung out Monday night with Dries Buytaert, founder and creator of Drupal, the open source content management system that is now powering tens of thousands of websites, including Ourmedia, The Onion, Sony Music artists (see myplay.com) and many others. Also spent time with Jay Batson, co-founder of Acquia, which just launched an important new partnership with Drupal on Tuesday.

In this 11-minute interview, Dries talks about Drupal, the power of open source publishing, and a new partnership with Acquia, the Boston-area company that gives citizen publishers a free publishing platform and tech support to get it up and running.

Drupal: open-source publishing from JD Lasica on Vimeo.

Acquia: Commercially supported Drupal

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
Download Squad

When it comes to choosing a content management system (CMS), the open-source Drupal is often a great choice for large or content-rich sites, because it scales well, supports multiple authors and is thoroughly customizable. The downside of all of this power is that for new users especially, the learning curve can be pretty steep. Although Drupal 6 was a huge step forward in overall usability, from a web admin perspective, it's still not exactly easy.

Acquia, a company founded by Drupal creator and project lead Dries Buytaert, has just launched Acquia Drupal, which packages Drupal and some of the most popular and highly rated community modules together and also offers commercial support. This is a big win for both Drupal and current and future Drupal users.

Acquia Drupal is a free GPL-licensed download. It contains the Drupal 6.x core (currently at 6.4), a bunch of community contributed modules, like Google Analytics, Mollom (Dries's spam-fighting content solution), and rating and image gallery tools. I installed Acquia Drupal on my local test server and also installed the latest Drupal release, 6.4. The install process was already easier with Acquia Drupal, because I didn't have to create a settings.php file in advance before filling in my database details.

Acquia Launches Commercial Drupal Distribution, Support Network

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
InformationWeek

Acquia today accomplished their goal of releasing a commercially supported version of the open source content management system Drupal. At the same time, they've launched the Acquia Network, a service that offers site management tools and various subscription-base levels of support for anyone running Drupal 6.

For many organizations, the challenge presented by Drupal is that while it's a powerful and flexible system, there hasn't historically been an "official" support model. Don't get me wrong - the Drupal community is very helpful and enthusiastic, but when your site goes down, you're stuck posting question and waiting for responses, or hoping your developer and site administrators can help out.

Acquia Debuts Drupal for Free

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
Mashable

Acquia has announced the availability of Acquia Drupal, a free and commercially supported distribution of the popular Drupal open source social publishing system. They also unveiled the Acquia Network, which offers subscription-based access to technical support and remote network services that simplify the development and operation of Drupal Web sites. Entry level subscriptions to the Acquia Network will be free of charge through the end of the year.

For those that aren’t overly familiar with Drupal, it’s an open source web development and content management platform that publishes, manages and organizes a wide variety of content on websites. Tens of thousands of people and organizations are using Drupal.

With the release of Acquia Drupal with its streamlined packaging of Drupal and a support system via the Acquia Network, there will definitely be a tremendous increase in Drupal developers and websites powered by this Drupal.

Acquia backs Drupal for enterprise adoption

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
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CNET

Drupal has always been a great open-source web content management system. Forrester called it one of the two open-source content management systems to consider. Its biggest deficiency was arguably a lack of enterprise-class support and polish to support the project.

Today, however, Acquia, the company behind Drupal, has remedied this void, launching its commercially-supported distribution of Drupal and a network service to provide updates and other services around the core Drupal distribution.

Acquia is taking a page out of Red Hat's playbook, boiling down the complexity of the deep and wide Drupal community. While I like the look of its Network service, it is the Acquia Drupal distribution that I think is most newsworthy for enterprises looking to adopt Drupal.

Acquia Delivers Commercially Supported Drupal

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
Ostatic

We've reported before on Acquia's effort to deliver a commercially supported version of the popular Drupal content management system (CMS). As of Tuesday morning, Acquia Drupal--the commercially supported version--and Acquia Network--which offers subscription-based access to technical support and remote network services--are going live. Acquia has also announced that entry-level subscriptions to the Acquia Network will be free of charge through the end of the year, so that people can try the services. Here are details, and some comments we got from Dries Buytaert, founder of Drupal and co-founder of Acquia.

Acquia Drupal is a packaged collection of the many social publishing and content creation tools and modules found in Drupal itself. It will be free to download as of Tuesday morning, and offered under the GNU public license. Acquia's business model is similar to Red Hat's and other companies that offer open source software for free, and get revenues from support and services. As we've reported before, OStatic is based on Drupal, as are many sites such as Fast Company and The Onion.

Drupal developer Barry Jaspan discusses Acquia

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
Linux.com

At the Linuxworld 2008 conference, Drupal developer Barry Jaspan discusses Drupal, development, and the recent formation of Acquia, a software and services company for Drupal. This interview explores the functioning of Drupal and how its development will be complemented by Acquia.

10 open source companies to watch

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
Network World

With the Open Source Conference (OSCon) and IDG's LinuxWorld show in the rearview mirror of 2008, it is clear that open source is no longer just a trendy conversation.

What has happened is a clear evolution of a community that has grown up and produced intelligent, cutting-edge technologies with an eye on making computing faster, smarter and cheaper for corporate users. Companies like Openmoko are challenging the mobile device market with its notion that users should control what applications are installed. Others like XAware and SnapLogic are opening up data integration possibilities, and still more are tangling with virtualization, databases, and trading systems. Along with a company accurately called Untangle, the companies' point is to make computing less complex.

The decision is no longer a question of open source, but about what product is best at solving computing problems regardless of how it was built.

Here is a look at 10 companies to watch.

Acquia's Carbon has Launched in Private Beta

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
CMS Wire

Acquia, the commercialization entity that resulted from the Drupal project, has finally released a private beta of Carbon — its commercial Drupal distribution. They’ve only been talking about the project since the end of April.

Acquia serves as a commercial backbone for supporting clients and businesses who want to utilize the open source project, and it appears that the company is making good on its goal.

Any person who has used Drupal could probably tell the story about how when he or she first saw the project. It looked very complex. It probably was a complex thing to grasp how it worked.

Furthermore, anyone coming from the likes of WordPress would likely be put into a seizure with all the stuff Drupal has going for it. Although, after getting past the initial shell-shock, users tend to quickly realize how vast and impressive the Drupal project really is—the power, the customization and the reliability are all tucked away in a light-weight modular package.

Acquia releases beta of commercial Drupal

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
The Open Road - CNET

Acquia has finally taken the wraps off its commercially supported Drupal distribution, and it looks like the wait was worth it. Drupal was already a great web content management publishing system, but Acquia's spin on it should make it even better:

The release is essentially a hardened distribution of Drupal, complemented with technical support and network service offerings. Code named Carbon for now, the package includes a select set of community contributed modules alongside the Drupal core. Acquia has taken the task of pre-testing, reviewing, and comparing all community contributed modules to offer a set of the most relevant and reliable contributions. Site administrators are notified of updates to Carbon modules through the network, code named Spokes. The system differentiates between feature, bug fix, and security updates, and informs users of compatibility issues or other dependencies amongst different modules.

I really like the idea behind Spokes. Drupal has a fantastic community, but some of the code it produces is not up to enterprise quality. Enter Acquia to make it clear what is worth using, and what is not. Complexity breeds opportunity.

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Acquia Announces Beta Launch of Commercial Drupal Distribution

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
TechCrunch

Today Acquia has announced the beta launch of a commercially supported distribution of Drupal. The first 100 visitors to register here will receive beta accounts, and those after will be atop the list for the next round of invites.

The release is essentially a hardened distribution of Drupal, complemented with technical support and network service offerings. Code named Carbon for now, the package includes a select set of community contributed modules alongside the Drupal core. Acquia has taken the task of pre-testing, reviewing, and comparing all community contributed modules to offer a set of the most relevant and reliable contributions. Site administrators are notified of updates to Carbon modules through the network, code named Spokes. The system differentiates between feature, bug fix, and security updates, and informs users of compatibility issues or other dependencies amongst different modules.

Acquia: Counting Down to Commercially Supported Drupal

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
Ostatic

The folks from Acquia were in San Francisco for the LinuxWorld conference this week. Acquia, as we've covered before, has been working away on an array of support offerings and services for the powerful open source Drupal content management system (CMS). OStatic is based on Drupal, as are sites such as Fast Company and The Onion. Acquia's goal is to apply a Red Hat-like approach to support and services for Drupal, and it will deliver these offerings later this year. I caught up with Barry Jaspan, security lead and principal engineer at Acquia, to find out what's cooking.

Acquia shored up $7 million in funding last December, and Acquia's co-founder Dries Buytaert also founded Drupal. (Disclosure: Acquia is a sponsor of OStatic.) Given the ubiquity and complexity of Drupal, along with the dearth of support for it, the small company may have a good strategy. When I spoke with Barry Jaspan, he was quick to conjure up comparisons between Acquia and Red Hat's business model.

TR35 2008 Young Innovator - Dries Buytaert

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
Technology Review

The Internet has made publishing on a global scale almost effortless. That's the rhetoric, anyway. The truth is more complicated, because the Internet provides only a means of distribution; a would-be publisher still needs a publishing tool. A decade ago, people who wanted such a tool had three choices, all bad: a cheap but inflexible system, a versatile but expensive one, or one written from scratch. What was needed was something in the ­middle, requiring neither enormous expense nor months of development--not a single application, but a platform for creating custom publishing environments. For tens of thousands of sites and millions of users, that something is Drupal.

Created as an open-source project by Dries Buytaert, Drupal is a free content management framework--a tool for building customized websites quickly and easily, without sacrificing features or stability. Site owners can choose from a list of possible features: they might, say, want to publish ­articles, offer each user a profile and a blog, or allow users to vote or comment on content. All these features are optional, and most are independent of the others.

Loopfuse and Acquia Bring Marketing Automation to Drupal

Submitted on
Tuesday, September 2, 2014
,
CMS Wire

Loopfuse and Acquia have announced the availability of the Loopfuse Integration module for Drupal. The module links Drupal installations to the commercial Loopfuse OneView automated marketing product. The module, funded by Acquia and Loopfuse, was developed to connect the Acquia website to OneView, and has been donated to the Drupal community and is available to download at Drupal.org.

Loopfuse OneView is aimed at small to medium-size organizations, offering an ‘all-in-one’ online marketing and sales solution. Oneview is a ‘full-featured marketing automation suite’, incorporating marketing campaign implementation and tracking, generating and tracking leads from a Website, full analytics support, and CRM integration with ‘most major vendors’.

We think this is a pretty good example of the Drupal project benefitting from Acquia’s forays into the commercial realm.

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